Tag Archives: clean transportation

Weekly News Check-In 10/4/19

WNCI-2

Welcome back.

Local resistance to gas infrastructure build-out has been active this week. We found news about the Weymouth compressor station, last week’s near miss in the Merrimack Valley, Granite Bridge and other pipelines. Meanwhile, climate activists were keeping the 9-foot tall Charlie Baker puppet busy on his Climate Catastrophe Tour. We also found lots of news about gas leaks.

On the climate front, DeSmog Blog published a troubling article about chummy relations between captains of the fossil fuel industry and leaders of large environmental non-profits at the recent climate summit. On a happier note, clean transportation could be getting a boost from the planned Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) being developed for the east coast.

Fossil fuel industry news includes articles about shoddy construction and oversight in the North Dakota oil patch, along with another warning about stranded assets. All this while the Trump Administration appears to be stacking the deck with an imbalance of Republicans on FERC.

We wrap up with biomass news from Massachusetts and a ban on single use plastic in Vermont.

— The NFGiM Team

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

Escalate - DEP Action
Compressor protester arrested at state offices as Markey tours site
By Jessica Trufant, The Patriot Ledger
October 2, 2019

An environmental activist was arrested Wednesday during a protest by opponents of a proposed natural gas compressor station in Weymouth who blocked the entrance to the state Department of Environmental Protection headquarters in Boston to demand that the agency reject the project.

Nathan Phillips, a Boston University professor, was arrested on a charge of trespassing by Boston police during the protest of the proposed 7,700-horsepower natural gas compressor station proposed by Algonquin, a subsidiary of Spectra Energy-Enbridge. The charge against Phillips was later dropped, said Laura Borth, a member of the Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station.

Borth was one of a handful of Weymouth residents who showed up at the agency Wednesday and blocked the entrance.

“I think the message of DEP needing to deny the remaining permits got across clear today,” she said.
» Read article


Weymouth compressor foes want new health study done
By Ed Baker, Wickedlocal.com
October 1, 2019

A state health impact assessment of a proposed compressor station site states there would be no substantial health impacts from direct exposure to the facility, but opponents want a new evaluation done.

“We gave a list of demands to Gov. Baker,” said Alice Arena, leader of the Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station (FRRACS). “We want to let Gov. Baker know we are not going away until the compressor goes away.”

Baker ordered a health impact assessment of the Fore River Basin in July 2017.

The study stated health impacts from the proposed compressor station may be possible through “perceived pollution levels and less comfort with using the nearby outdoor space.”

Weymouth resident Andrea Honore said the state health impact assessment was flawed because it did not get underway until late 2018.

“He (Baker) promised it would be done in 2017, but nothing happened until late 2018,” she said. “It was a condensed study with hundreds of pages. It was not done properly.”
» Read article

» More Weymouth compressor station articles

MERRIMACK VALLEY GAS EXPLOSIONS

Human error cause of latest Lawrence gas leak, officials say
By WCVB, Channel 5
September 28, 2019

A gas leak that forced hundreds of Lawrence residents from their homes early Friday was caused by human error, according to officials.

In a joint statement, the Department of Public Utilities, Columbia Gas and the City of Lawrence said contractors working for the city inadvertently closed a gas valve, puncturing a gas main in the process.

Officials believe this gas valve was not compliant with DPU standards should have been disabled as part of pipeline reconstruction in 2018.
» Read article

» More Merrimack Valley gas incident articles

GRANITE BRIDGE PIPELINE

Granite Bridge pipeline protesters
300 join Climate Strike in Manchester calling for protection of NH environment
By Laura Aronson, Manchester Ink Link
September 22, 2019

The Global Climate Strike on Friday, September 20, drew millions worldwide, including more than 300 people in Manchester. Nearly a dozen events were planned in New Hampshire. Locals met at Victory Park at 12 p.m. for a march on Elm Street to a rally at Manchester City Hall.

Organizer Jennifer Dube of 350NH said, “I am striking because Manchester does not need the Granite Bridge Pipeline transporting fracked methane gas along Lake Massabesic, threatening their water supply. I am striking because my town of Raymond does not need Liberty Utilities running a gas pipeline under the Lamprey River two times. I am striking because the town of Epping right next door to me does not need Liberty Utilities putting a target on its back: a gigantic, 170 foot high, 200 foot wide tank sized to store 2 billion cubic feet of natural liquid gas.  With projects like that in the works, it is clear that New Hampshire is not on the path to [100] percent clean, safe, renewable energy. We are fighting to stop this harmful pipeline project and to shut down the last, major, coal-fired power plant in New Hampshire. We call on our elected officials to publicly opposed the Granite  Bridge Pipeline project and to endorse the Green New Deal.”
» Read article

» More Granite Bridge pipeline articles

OTHER PIPELINES

Supreme Court - pipelinesSUPREME COURT: 4 pipeline fights to watch this term
By Niina H. Farah, E&E News
September 30, 2019

The Supreme Court could decide to wade into the natural gas pipeline wars this term.

As the court begins its 2019 session, energy experts are watching whether the justices will weigh in on federal permitting, eminent domain and state sovereignty issues around pipeline construction.

So far, the justices have opportunities to consider the Forest Service’s authority to permit the Atlantic Coast pipeline to cross the Appalachian Trail and to decide whether developers of the Mountain Valley project can lawfully seize private property before paying. Solicitor General Noel Francisco has urged the justices to hear the Atlantic Coast dispute, which significantly boosts the case’s odds of review.

“Natural gas and oil pipeline infrastructure is not getting less controversial and the Supreme Court may find it appropriate to issue a ruling that definitively settles the matter,” ClearView Energy Partners LLC wrote in a recent analysis.

A third possible case involving state lands takings for the PennEast pipeline may also be brought before the Supreme Court. The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is still mulling a request to reconsider its decision to block developers’ access to New Jersey-owned acreage.
» Read article

The $109 Million Lobbying Effort To Run A Pipeline Through National Treasures
The proposed 600-mile-long Atlantic Coast Pipeline would bisect the Appalachian Trail, the Blue Ridge Parkway and a pair of national forests.
By Frank Bass, Huffington Post
September 25, 2019

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a 600-mile-long project that has been compared to the Dakota Access Pipeline because of its stiff opposition from Native and local communities, would bisect the fabled trail, as well as the Blue Ridge Parkway and a pair of national forests.
Appeals courts have thrown out seven separate permits for the project, with sentiment running so high that one judge wrote an opinion using a quote from The Lorax to blast the U.S. Forest Service for its failure “to speak for the trees, for the trees have no tongues.” Despite the setbacks, the utilities have continued to press their case, hoping the rulings can be overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court or Congress. The companies ― Dominion Energy, Duke Energy, and Southern Co. ― have described the Atlantic Coast Pipeline as “a critical infrastructure project that will strengthen the economic vitality, environmental health, and energy security of the Mid-Atlantic region.” The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which separately has spent almost $361 million lobbying since the project was announced, estimates economic losses of $91.9 billion and 730,000 lost jobs if the pipeline isn’t built.

The battle over the pipeline highlights the shifting landscape for power companies, which have been presenting natural gas as an energy source that can serve as a bridge fuel during the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, even while the effects of climate change become more apparent. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would transfer as much as 1.5 billion cubic feet of gas daily from West Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania shale fields to facilities in Virginia and North Carolina.
» Read article

» More pipeline articles

REGIONAL ENERGY CHESS GAME

Climate and transportation activists are carrying a 9-foot-tall Charlie Baker puppet around Massachusetts. Here’s why.
By Christopher Gavin, Boston.com   
September 23, 2019

With the impacts of climate change looming larger year after year, local activists are literally looking to make a big statement around Massachusetts this week.

A nine-foot-tall Gov. Charlie Baker puppet will tower over the volunteers for 350 Mass for a Better Future, a Cambridge-based climate advocacy group carrying the two-dimensional mock-up of the state’s Republican chief executive to several towns and cities on what the group dubbed the “Charlie’s Climate Catastrophe Tour.”

The Baker administration has failed to combat the causes of climate change, particularly fossil fuel dependency, and to lead on the transportation issues plaguing the Commonwealth, Craig Altemose, executive director of Better Future Project, told Boston.com Monday.

That’s why climate and transportation activists are hitting up the sites where they say Baker’s leadership is lacking, from the Weymouth compressor station to a proposed electrical substation in East Boston.
» Read article

» More regional energy news

GAS LEAKS NEWS

Gas leaks in Springfield
Could it happen here?: Gas explosion in Merrimack Valley hangs over new pipeline efforts
By Chris Goudreau, Valley Advocate
October 2, 2019

In response to the [Merrimack Valley] disaster, Gov. Charlie Baker ordered the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) to commission a comprehensive independent assessment of the gas distribution system in the Commonwealth. In March, Gov. Baker signed legislation allocating $1.5 million toward the creation of that study by Texas-based Dynamic Risk Assessment Systems chosen by the DPU.

But Gov. Baker and the state of Massachusetts aren’t the only ones investigating the gas infrastructure in the Commonwealth. A coalition of more than 10 nonprofits called Gas Leaks Allies recently published its own 60-page study on Sept. 13 titled Rolling the Dice: Assessment of Gas System Safety in Massachusetts, which covers the condition of the gas systems, analyses gas incidents in the state, examines utility practices and DPU oversight, and looks at the future of natural gas in Massachusetts.

“Longer-term safety, health, and climate protection require an orderly, cost-effective, managed transition from dependence on gas to a safer, cleaner, and more resilient system based on renewable energy, thermal technologies, and energy efficiency,” it concludes.
» Read article    
» Read “Rolling the Dice” study

Activists mark gas leaks in Easthampton, citing environmental and safety concerns
By BERA DUNAU, Daily Hampshire Gazette
October 2, 2019


EASTHAMPTON — A group of activists spent Sunday labeling the sites of reported gas leaks in the city to draw attention to what they consider to be environmental and public safety concerns.

In Massachusetts, gas companies are required to report the sites of gas leaks annually. In 2018, 17 unrepaired leaks were reported in Easthampton.

“They do it at the end of the year,” said Connie Dawson, of Easthampton, who helped organize the event.

Dawson said Columbia Gas repaired 11 Grade 1 leaks in 2018, leaks that have to be repaired immediately because they represent a safety hazard, according to information the group gleaned from the Home Energy Efficiency Team, a Cambridge-based nonprofit that focuses on energy efficiency.

On Sunday, each of the 17 reported leaks were labeled with signs, in an event sponsored by Easthampton Climate Action and the Easthampton Democratic Committee.

Dawson expressed concern with the leaks both from a safety perspective and with the methane they leak into the environment. Dawson also said that there may be other leaks.

“It doesn’t include any leaks that may have occurred since then,” she said.
» Read article

State utility regulator slams Columbia Gas
DPU wants “detailed work plan” describing how gas company intends to prevent leaks
By Bill Kirk, Eagle-Tribune
October 1, 2019

LAWRENCE — The state Department of Public Utilities came out swinging Tuesday, hammering Columbia Gas for breaking federal law in one letter and then threatening to fine them $1 million for every violation listed in another letter – both of which were issued as a result of last Friday’s Level 1 gas leak.

Last week’s leak forced the evacuation of dozens of homes and businesses in the same South Lawrence neighborhood devastated by last year’s gas disaster. Hundreds of people were displaced and forced to seek reimbursement for lost food, wages and more.

In the first letter, issued Tuesday morning, DPU Chairman Matthew Nelson told Columbia Gas President Mark Kempic that the utility company must submit a “detailed work plan” describing how it intends to prevent future gas leaks like the one that occurred around 3 a.m. Friday.
» Read article  

» More gas leaks articles

CLIMATE

OGCI members at UN
Oil Industry Set Agenda During Climate Summit Meeting with Big Greens
By Sharon Kelly, DeSmog Blog
September 30, 2019

Last week, as climate activist Greta Thunberg addressed the United Nations Climate Action Summit, invited leaders from major environmental groups spent their day listening to the leaders of fossil fuel companies discuss how they want to respond to the climate crisis.

Depending on which room you were in, you would have heard two very different messages.

Thunberg’s widely watched speech evoked the urgency of acting on climate change.

“People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing,” Thunberg told the UN summit. “We are in the beginning of a mass extinction, and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth.”

Just blocks away, the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), whose members include oil giants like ExxonMobil, Shell, Chevron, Saudi Aramco, and BP, was meeting with representatives from large environmental organizations, talking about ways to moderately reduce greenhouse gas pollution while continuing business as usual.
» Read article

plunger
Climate Change May Take Away Your Ability to Flush the Toilet
By K Thor Jensen, Newsweek
September 30, 2019

A new United Nations report states that rising sea levels could render as many as 60 million toilets inoperable in the United States alone, as traditional septic systems are threatened by increased groundwater.

About 1 in 5 American households rely on septic systems to handle their toilet waste, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. These systems work by draining flushed toilets into an underground tank, where bacteria breaks it down into water and solid sludge. That water moves through an outflow tube into a drainage field.

However, as sea levels rise, those drainage fields are becoming saturated, preventing them from absorbing liquid from septic tanks. In addition, erosion removes the necessary soft earth to filter out pollutants, resulting in public health hazards and groundwater contamination.
» Read article

At the Edge of a Warming World
By Nestor Ramos, Boston Globe
September 26, 2019

The Cape we love is at risk now. Cape Cod is perched on a stretch of ocean warming faster than nearly any in the world. And as much as we might wish it away, as hard as we try to ignore it, the effects of climate change here are already visible, tangible, measurable, disturbing.

Perfect summers have grown hotter and muggier. Storms arrive violently, and more often. Occasionally, nature sends up an even more ostentatious flare: A historic home vanishes. The earth opens up and swallows a Honda Civic. A seasoned fisherman on the waters off Provincetown peers over starboard and spies an unmistakable shock of electric green: mahi-mahi, visiting from the tropics.
» Read article

» More climate articles

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

TCI moving forward
East Coast states outline carbon pricing plan

Plan would use tax-like structure on fuel
By Andy Metzger, CommonWealth Magazine
October 1, 2019

OFFICIALS FROM MASSACHUSETTS and Maryland on Tuesday laid out in broad strokes their plans for a forthcoming program across the East Coast to reduce harmful tailpipe emissions and fund greener transportation alternatives by pricing the carbon contained in gas and diesel fuels.

The proposal would mimic a gasoline tax from the perspective of consumers, but it is distinct from a traditional tax in a few ways, as a Baker administration official noted on Tuesday.

Known as the Transportation Climate Initiative, or TCI, it is an ambitious effort involving a dozen states from Maine to Virginia that are collectively trying to cut down on planet-warming emissions from cars and trucks, which have increased in recent decades despite global efforts to halt climate change.
» Read article

» More clean transportation articles

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY NEWS

Whistle-blower Reveals Flawed Construction at North Dakota Gas Plants Where Massive Spill Was Downplayed
By Justin Nobel, DeSmog Blog
October 1, 2019

Two North Dakota gas processing plants in the heart of the Bakken oil fields have shown signs of an eroded safety culture and startling construction problems, according to Paul Lehto, a 54-year-old former gas plant operator who has come out as a whistle-blower. He described worrisome conditions at the Lonesome Creek plant, in Alexander, and the Garden Creek plant, in Watford City, where DeSmog recently revealed one of the largest oil and gas industry spills in U.S. history had occurred. Both plants process natural gas brought via pipeline from Bakken wells and are run by the Oklahoma-based oil and gas service company, ONEOK Partners.

“The safety culture is embarrassing,” said Lehto, who has described to DeSmog the discovery of dozens of loose bolts along critical sections of piping, and other improperly set equipment, deficiencies he attributes to the frenzied rush of the oil boom that has dominated the state’s landscape and economy. “North Dakota is basically a Petrostate,” said Lehto, who worked at the two plants between 2015 and 2016. “There is regulatory capture, and sure that happens in other areas, but nowhere is it more extreme than in North Dakota.”

“The reason I am coming forward is that while I didn’t think ONEOK was doing their job, I still trusted the state to regulate and do its job,” said Lehto. “But in reading what the state’s response was to the condensate spill, I have lost all confidence that the state is acting as a legitimate regulator.”
» Read article

The Stranded Asset Threat to Natural Gas
This week on The Interchange podcast: Is natural gas the new coal?
By Stephen Lacey, GreenTech Media
September 27, 2019

There are $70 billion worth of natural-gas-fired power plants planned in the U.S. through the mid-2020s. But a combination of wind, solar, batteries and demand-side management could threaten up to 90 percent of those investments.

New modeling from the Rocky Mountain Institute shows that more than 60 gigawatts of new gas plants are already economically challenged by those technologies. And by the mid-2030s, existing gas plants will be under threat.

How severe is the threat? Could we eventually see tens of gigawatts of stranded gas plants?

RMI set out to answer that question in two reports on the economics of gas generation and gas pipelines. The tipping point is now, it concludes.
» Play podcast

» More fossil fuel articles

FERC

Trump bucks bipartisan tradition with plan to nominate Republican FERC commissioner
By Iulia Gheorghiu, Utility Dive
October 2, 2019

President Donald Trump intends to nominate a Republican for one of two vacancies on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, according to a White House announcement Monday.

Although the administration had previously advanced pairs of Republican and Democratic nominees together, when possible, Trump will nominate FERC general counsel James Danly. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Ranking Member Joe Manchin, W.Va., noted his disappointment with the administration’s “failing to honor the tradition of a bipartisan pairing” for the independent agency.

The White House could still announce the nomination of a Democrat in order to maintain the bipartisan pairing tradition, and they have options. A rumored Democratic candidate, Allison Clements, received pre-clearance this summer from a designated ethics agent for her ethics guidance and financial disclosure, according to sources familiar with the matter.
» Read article

» More FERC articles

BIOMASS

At hearing on Mass. forest protection bill, it’s climate vs. industry
By Larry Parnass, The Berkshire Eagle
September 25, 2019

BOSTON — Competing views of the impact of logging in state-owned forests at a time of climate crisis clashed Tuesday at a hearing chaired by a Berkshires lawmaker.

The Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture took over two hours of testimony on a bill, “An Act Relative to Forest Protection,” that would classify all state land as parks or reserves, with virtually no allowance for commercial logging.

Berkshire County is home to thousands of acres of state forest that would be affected by the change proposed in the bill filed this year by state Rep. Susannah M. Whipps of Athol.

Opponents, including the Massachusetts Forest Alliance, say the measure would hurt municipalities that receive revenues from logging and weaken the state’s forest products industry. They contend state-owned forests are already sequestering carbon at impressive levels and in that way playing a role in combating climate change.

But as global leaders meet this week in New York City to discuss climate change, some who back the bill pressed the committee to do its part to ensure Massachusetts is living up to its climate goals.

Michael Kellett, executive director of the nonprofit Restore: The North Woods, said the bill would enable publicly owned trees on land that represents a fifth of all Massachusetts forests to continue to draw in and hold carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The measure would affect roughly 610,000 acres of forest.

“We face a climate emergency and this is a simple and effective way to help increase the capacity of our forests to protect biodiversity and sequester carbon now and in the future,” Kellett said.
» Read article

» More biomass articles

PLASTIC BANS

Vermont plastic banVermont Takes Next Steps in Stopping Toxic Plastic Pollution
We break down the toxic toll of plastic pollution as state working group convenes to document health and environmental impacts
By Jen Duggan, Conservation Law Foundation
October 2, 2019

Earlier this year, CLF helped Vermont pass the strongest state law in the nation to reduce dangerous plastic pollution. Act 69 tackles four of the most common single-use plastics by banning plastic bags, stirrers, and toxic polystyrene food packaging and making plastic straws available only on request.

The new law also directs legislators and other stakeholders to work together this fall to develop even stronger measures to curb the use of toxic plastic products. The group, called the Single-Use Products Working Group, must submit a report by December 1, 2019, to the Vermont General Assembly that documents the public health and environmental impacts of plastic pollution and identifies additional action to address the plastic crisis.

Plastic is much more than a litter problem. It exposes us to harmful chemicals and contributes to the climate crisis. We must eliminate all single-use plastics – or risk more harm to our health, our environment, and our climate. As the Working Group meets over the coming months, CLF will be there at every step to push for the bold action and creative solutions we need to tackle our plastic crisis.
» Read web post    

» More plastic ban articles

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Weekly News Check-In 9/6/19

WNCI-7

Welcome back.

We’re pleased to bring you a nice profile article on our friend and ally Pat Martin, who has staunchly resisted the expansion of fossil fuel infrastructure while tirelessly advocating for clean, renewable energy.

In local news, Weymouth has another delay in the compressor station approval process, and we have a link to an interesting podcast on last year’s Merrimack Valley gas explosions.

On the climate, we’re approaching a potential tipping point beyond which the Amazon rain forest cannot recover – a prolonged and terminal state of die-back. We also found a provocative and informative video to get everyone calibrated on how much renewable energy we really need as we fully decarbonize – and some uncomfortable choices we’ll face.

We’re making progress on renewables, but a new study finds we’re not moving fast enough. And as promised, the Trump administration appears closer to eliminating California’s independence in setting vehicle emissions standards.

Looking at the fossil fuel industry, we find continuing investments in new infrastructure that will not pay off in the event that the Paris Climate Accords are met. A red flag for investors and also for the planet.

— The NFGiM Team

FEATURE

Pat Martin, A Tireless Advocate for Clean Energy
Paul Cuno-Booth, SentinalSource.com
August 30, 2019

Patricia Martin still remembers the oil crisis of the 1970s. The gasoline rationing, the long lines at gas pumps.

Martin, then a young woman, also absorbed something else: “All the people talking about, ‘It doesn’t have to be this way.’ ”

It stayed with her. In the decades since, Martin has continued to think about energy issues and work on them in her spare time. Now, with humanity facing a much more severe crisis — that of climate change — she’s drawing on a lifetime of passion and expertise to tackle the issue on the local, state and regional levels.

Martin, 69, a Rindge resident, chairs her town’s energy commission. She gives to national climate-advocacy groups. She has been arrested twice in acts of climate-motivated civil disobedience.

Several years ago, she helped fight off the proposed Northeast Energy Direct gas pipeline, which would have run through Rindge and other Cheshire County communities. She tracks N.H. Public Utilities Commission dockets and comments on proposed fossil-fuel projects. She’s involved in efforts to bring more solar power to the Monadnock Region.

These days, much of her energy goes toward working with a group called Mothers Out Front, a national organization advocating for a transition to clean energy.
» Read article

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

State Delays Review Of Proposed Natural Gas Compressor Station In Weymouth
By Chris Lisinski, State House News Service via WBUR
September 3, 2019

A key state agency’s decision on a natural gas compressor station proposal in Weymouth will not come this week as anticipated following an agreement to delay the review process once again.

The Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs told the News Service on Tuesday that the parties involved agreed to another one-month stay on Aug. 16. Regulators will now restart their review on Sept. 16 and complete it by Oct. 5 unless they seek further delays.
» Read article

» More Weymouth compressor station articles

COLUMBIA GAS / MERRIMACK VALLEY DISASTER

Fire in the Valley
Episode 1: The First Minutes Of A Disaster
By Sean Corcoran, WGBH Podcast
September 6, 2019

Within moments of the first alarms, homes and businesses in the Merrimack Valley are aflame. Hundreds of people call 9-1-1, as thousands of residents in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover run from their homes, seeking safety in the streets. By the time the gas is shut off, 131 buildings are damaged or destroyed, one person is dead, and nearly two dozen are transported to hospitals.
» Play podcast

» More on the 2018 disaster

CLIMATE

burned amazon
‘It’s Really Close’: How the Amazon Rainforest Could Self-Destruct
Climate change and man-made fires could set off a cycle of self-perpetuating deforestation, scientists warn.
By Max Fisher, New York Times
August 30, 2019

As fires rage across the Amazon, a growing number of scientists are raising the alarm about a nightmare scenario that could see much of the world’s largest rainforest erased from the earth.

Climate change, along with the fires and other man-made forces, appear on the verge of triggering a significant change in the Amazon’s weather system.

No one knows for sure whether and when this might happen, though some scientists who study the Amazon ecosystem call it imminent. If it does happen, a body of research suggests, the Amazon as a whole would cross a tipping point and begin to self-destruct — a process of self-perpetuating deforestation known as dieback.

If that is left unchecked, half or more of the rainforest could erode into savanna, according to some estimates, and then the rainforest, which has long absorbed the world’s greenhouse gases, could instead begin to emit them.
» Read article

First Gigawatt Down (Part II)
Video by Footprint to Wings
Published on July 30, 2019

Climate solutions like you’ve never seen them before. Are you ready to race to zero carbon? What’s your favorite play? Do you have what it takes to move your team to get a first gigawatt down in that play?
» Blog editor’s note: video contains excellent examples of what massive deployment of renewable energy sources like wind and solar entail. The conclusion to temporarily maintain nuclear energy in the mix is controversial but deserves sober consideration. Note that the video does not promote development of new nuke sites.
» Watch video

» More climate articles

CLEAN ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

Renewable Energy’s Booming, But Still Falling Far Short of Climate Goals
Power sector emissions would have been 15 percent higher in 2018 without the past decade’s renewable energy growth, a UNEP report shows.
By Kristoffer Tigue, InsideClimate News
September 6, 2019

Renewable energy capacity quadrupled worldwide over the past 10 years, with an estimated $2.6 trillion invested in its growth, a new report from the United Nations Environment Programme shows. But the speed of that growth still falls far short of what researchers say is needed to keep global warming in check.

To meet the Paris climate agreement aim of keeping global warming under 1.5 degrees Celsius, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported last year that the world would need to invest an average of about $3 trillion to $3.5 trillion every year between 2016 and 2050.

“There is certainly a global shift,” said Kathy Hipple, an analyst with the Institute for Energy, Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA). “The question is, ‘Is it moving fast enough from a climate perspective?’ And arguably it’s not.”
» Read article

» More clean energy alternatives articles

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

CARB independence
White House Prepares to Revoke California’s Right to Set Tougher Pollution Rules
By Coral Davenport, New York Times
September 5, 2019

President Trump is strongly considering a plan to revoke California’s legal authority to set state tailpipe pollution standards that are stricter than federal regulations, according to three people familiar with the matter.

The potential challenge to California’s authority, which would be a stinging broadside to the state’s governor and environmentalists, has been widely anticipated. But what’s notable is that the administration would be decoupling its challenge to California from its broader plan to weaken federal fuel economy standards, the latest sign that its plans for that rollback have fallen into disarray.
» Read article

» More clean transportation articles

FOSSIL FUEL NEWS

stranded fossil investments at 2C
New Oil Projects Won’t Pay Off If World Meets Paris Climate Goals, Report Shows

Not a single tar sands project is likely to pay back investors under a 2°C global warming scenario, Carbon Tracker found.
By Nicholas Kusnetz, InsideClimate News
September 6, 2019

The world’s leading oil companies increasingly have argued that they must be part of the world’s transition to a low-carbon future. But a new report shows that despite their rhetoric, they continue to spend their money as if that transition may never come.

In just the past year, the biggest global companies committed billions of dollars to projects that will likely lose money if the world slashes fossil fuel use fast enough to meet the Paris climate accord goals, the report, released Thursday night, shows. That poses serious risks to investors.
» Read article

2020 Looks Like the Breakout Year for Building Decarbonization in California
Policymakers are coalescing around electrification as the solution for squeezing carbon out of buildings. Is the market ready?
By Justin Gerdes, Greentech Media
August 23, 2019

California has just 25 years to achieve its economywide carbon-neutrality target. Buildings account for about a quarter of California’s greenhouse gas emissions, so concerted efforts will be needed to squeeze carbon out of the sector, especially existing buildings.

State policymakers are increasingly coalescing around a solution: electrification. As a recent California Energy Commission (CEC) report put it: “There is a growing consensus that building electrification is the most viable and predictable path to zero-emission buildings.”

Recent events underscore this sentiment. California regulators just overhauled a legacy policy that acted as a brake on building electrification. New incentives for electric appliances could be available by the end of this year. Meanwhile, local governments across California are moving to adopt bans on new natural-gas hookups, grabbing the attention of the state’s powerful oil and gas industry.
» Read article

» More fossil fuel articles

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Weekly News Check-In 8/30/19

WNCI-6

Welcome back.

Opposition to the planned Weymouth compressor station continues, while in a disturbing twist of events the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) breathed new life into the Constitution Pipeline, considered defeated in New York three years ago. And as these things go, the Dakota Access Pipeline recently applied to double its capacity, bringing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe back into the fight.

In climate news, the Trump Administration wants to roll back regulations on methane emissions, and InsideClimate News published a great explainer on what the United Nation’s 2030 deadline for cutting fossil fuel emissions means scientifically.

We’re reporting more innovations in clean energy alternatives, and news about clean transportation ranges from the sublime (Alice, the electric airplane!) to the way far out (huge zeppelins).

In fossil fuel industry news, we’re following growing awareness in South Portland, Maine that their petroleum product storage tanks and export terminals are the likely source of worrisome benzine levels recently picked up at air monitoring stations around town. Meanwhile, the Environmental Protection Agency is pursuing a rule change that would remove a key right of states to contest pipeline projects on concerns about water pollution (article references Constitution Pipeline – see above).

We conclude with a terrific article from Vox.com that considers the effectiveness of plastic bag bans, and offers guidance on the best policies.

— The NFGiM Team

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch talks Weymouth compressor station, healthcare and Trump in Braintree
By Audrey Cooney, Wicked Local Braintree
August 27, 2019

At a town hall event in Braintree last week, U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch discussed efforts to stop construction of the Weymouth compressor station, his opposition for Medicare for All and his views on how to stop President Donald Trump from winning reelection.

In response to a question about the proposed natural gas compressor station in Weymouth on the banks of the Fore River, Lynch said his position has not changed in the two years since the project was announced.

“I just think it’s unnecessary,” he said.

In April, Lynch filed Pipeline and Compressor Safety Verification Act of 2019, a bill specifically meant to stop construction of the Weymouth compressor station that “prohibits the construction and operation of specified natural gas projects until certain Massachusetts state agencies certify that such projects do not pose a danger to surrounding residential communities and the general public,” according to the bill’s text.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which regulates energy projects that cross state lines, is an egregious example of a government agency and private industry going against the best interest of residents, Lynch said. FERC is funded by the energy companies it oversees.
» Read article

» More Weymouth compressor station articles

OTHER PIPELINES

FERC puts Constitution Pipeline back on track, finding New York waived water authority
By Maya Weber, S&P Global
August 29, 2019

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has found that New York waived its water quality authority for Williams’ Constitution Pipeline, giving new life to a natural gas project stalled since April 2016 when state regulators denied a permit.

The 124-mile project is designed to ship up to 650 MMcf/d of northeastern Pennsylvania gas production to interconnections with the Iroquois Gas Transmission and Tennessee Gas Pipeline in upstate New York.

The commission, by a 4-0 vote late Wednesday, reversed its earlier finding — that the New York review could not be waived — in light of a recent DC Circuit Court of Appeals ruling in Hoopa Valley v. FERC. The Hoopa case had involved a hydropower project for which states and PacifiCorp agreed to defer the Clean Water Act’s one-year statutory deadline by annually withdrawing and resubmitting the water permit.
» Read article

Feds clear way for Constitution Pipeline in New York over state’s objection
By Chad Arnold, Albany Bureau, Democrat & Chronicle
August 29, 2019

ALBANY – Federal regulators allowed the Constitution Pipeline to move forward Wednesday, ruling New York took too long to deny a key permit that had been blocking construction of the proposed natural-gas line.

The decision handed down by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission found the state Department of Environmental Conservation waived its right to reject the necessary water-quality permit for the pipeline because the state agency failed to act in a timely manner.

The ruling comes three years after DEC denied the pipeline builder’s permit application for failing “to meet New York state’s water quality standards.”

It clears the way for Williams Partners LP, the gas company heading the project, to move ahead with the Pennsylvania-to-New York line, though the state is likely to challenge the decision.

The 124-mile, 30-inch-wide pipeline would carry from Pennsylvania across New York’s Southern Tier, cutting through eastern Broome County and Delaware County en route to Schoharie County, west of Albany.
» Read article

Why the Mountain Valley Pipeline is uniquely risky
By Jacob Hileman, Virginia Mercury – Opinion
August 22, 2019

Since 1997, FERC has approved no fewer than 46 new natural gas mega-pipelines, defined here as pipelines that are at least 24 inches in diameter, more than 100 miles long, and not installed along pre-existing utility corridors.

A review of the landslide hazard information contained in the environmental impact statements (EIS) for this set of pipelines reveals 22 of them – almost half – do not traverse any high landslide risk areas at all. The remaining 24 pipelines cross anywhere from 0.2 to more than 200 miles of high risk terrain.

Out of all these mega-pipeline projects, MVP finds itself infamously at the top of the list, having routed 225 miles of the pipeline – 74 percent of its total length – across high landslide risk terrain.
» Read article

Columbia Gas Denied Right to Take Public Land for Potomac Pipeline
By Anne Meador, DC Media Group
August 21, 2019

The TransCanada subsidiary had filed a lawsuit against the state of Maryland in June in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to force access to the Maryland Rail Trail, a necessary piece to construct a 3.7-mile pipeline from Fulton County, Pa., through a thin slice of Maryland. In January, the Maryland Board of Public Works, which included Governor Larry Hogan, denied Columbia Gas an easement.

Columbia Gas’s lawsuit was unusual in that a private company tried to use the power of eminent domain to take public land. It claimed that power by virtue of the permit granted to the project by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The judge denied Columbia Gas injunctive relief because it found no substantive case, Upper Potomac Riverkeeper Brent Walls said in a statement delivered by live stream after the ruling. Private industry doesn’t have the right to file an eminent domain case against the state of Maryland, the judge found, because the state has sovereign immunity, he said.

Opponents of the pipeline project were jubilant outside the courthouse following the judge’s ruling.
» Read article

Standing Rock protesters
Standing Rock Asks Court to Shut Down Dakota Access Pipeline as Company Plans to Double Capacity
Several of the Democrats running for president are now pledging to revoke permits for both the Dakota Access and Keystone XL oil pipelines if elected.
By Phil McKenna, InsideClimate News
August 20, 2019

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is asking a judge to throw out a federal permit for the Dakota Access oil pipeline, arguing that the government shut the tribe out of a court-ordered second environmental review and ignored its concerns.

The challenge comes as Energy Transfer, the company behind the pipeline, is now seeking to double how much oil the pipeline can carry. The Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) passes under the Missouri River, the tribe’s water supply, just upstream from the Standing Rock Reservation.

The Army Corps of Engineers “never engaged with the Tribe or its technical experts, shared critical information, or responded to the Tribe’s concerns,” the tribe writes in a legal motion filed Friday in federal court. “The result is an irretrievably flawed decision, developed through a process that fell far short of legal standards. With DAPL’s proposal to double the flow of the pipeline, the unexamined risks to the Tribe continue to grow.”
» Read article

» More pipeline articles

CLIMATE

methane emissions
E.P.A. to Roll Back Regulations on Methane, a Potent Greenhouse Gas
By Lisa Friedman, New York Times
August 29, 2019

The Environmental Protection Agency, in a proposed rule, will aim to eliminate federal government requirements that the oil and gas industry put in place technology to inspect for and repair methane leaks from wells, pipelines and storage facilities.

The proposed rollback is particularly notable because major oil and gas companies have, in fact, opposed it, just as some other industries have opposed the Trump administration’s other major moves to dismantle climate change and other environmental rules put in place by President Barack Obama.
» Read article

What Does ’12 Years to Act on Climate Change’ (Now 11 Years) Really Mean?
It doesn’t mean the world can wait until 2030 to cut greenhouse gas emissions, or that chaos will erupt in 2030. Here’s what the science shows.
By Bob Berwyn, InsideClimate News
August 27, 2019

We’ve been hearing variations of the phrase “the world only has 12 years to deal with climate change” a lot lately. But where does the idea of having 11 or 12 years come from, and what does it actually mean?

Basics physics and climate science allow scientists to calculate how much CO2 it takes to raise the global temperature—and how much CO2 can still be emitted before global warming exceeds 1.5°C (2.7°F) compared to pre-industrial times.

Scientists worked backward from that basic knowledge to come up with timelines for what would have to happen to stay under 1.5°C warming, said Scott Denning, who studies the warming atmosphere at Colorado State University.

“They figured out how much extra heat we can stand. They calculated how much CO2 would produce that much heat, then how much total fuel would produce that much CO2. Then they considered ‘glide paths’ for getting emissions to zero before we burn too much carbon to avoid catastrophe,” he said.

“All this work gets summarized as ‘in order to avoid really bad outcomes, we have to be on a realistic glide path toward a carbon-free global economy by 2030.’ And that gets translated to something like ’emissions have to fall by half in a decade,’ and that gets oversimplified to ’12 years left.’
» Read article

On David Koch’s Passing and the Koch Network’s Ongoing War on Clean Energy
By Ben Jervey, DeSmog Blog
August 26, 2019

We will leave the mourning to his family and friends, and the condemning to those who were immediately impacted by his efforts — a massive group, considering the far-reaching impacts of climate change, which are already being felt across all continents and latitudes.

Though many reports, obituaries, and commentaries on his death have portrayed David as an equal partner in the “Koch brothers” tandem, longtime Koch historians have noted that his brother Charles was the driving force in many of the Koch network’s activist and political efforts.

The constellation of think tanks and front groups and citizen advocacy organizations — and the foundations and dark money groups that support them — will continue to do Charles Koch’s bidding.
» Read article

Heat Deaths Jump in Southwest United States, Puzzling Officials
By Christopher Flavelle and Nadja Popovich, New York Times
August 26, 2019

The long-term health effects of rising temperatures and heat waves are expected to be one of the most dangerous consequences of climate change, causing “tens of thousands of additional premature deaths per year across the United States by the end of this century,” according to the federal government’s Global Change Research Program. The effect could be even more severe in other parts of the world, potentially making parts of North Africa and the Middle East “uninhabitable.”

The increase in deaths also illustrates how climate change can exacerbate other challenges. Experts say the death toll is likely to reflect the growing ranks of vulnerable groups, and the failure to protect those groups from global warming.
» Read article

fracking rig
Fracking may be a bigger climate problem than we thought
The mysterious recent spike in methane emissions? It just might be US fracking.
By David Roberts, Vox.com
August 16, 2019

When it comes to reducing CO2 emissions, the chain between cause and effect is frustratingly long and diffuse. Reduced emissions today won’t show up as reduced climate impacts for decades.

But with methane, the chain of causation is much shorter and simpler. Reduced emissions have an almost immediate climate impact. It’s a short-term climate lever, and if the countries of the world are going to hold rising temperatures to the United Nations’ target of “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above the preindustrial baseline, they’re going to need all the short-term climate levers they can get.

In the real world, though, the news about methane is bad and getting worse. It turns out that a mysterious recent spike in global methane levels that’s putting climate targets at risk may be coming from US oil and gas fracking. If that’s true, it’s bad news, because there’s lots more shale gas development in the pipeline and the Trump administration is busy rolling back regulations on the industry.
» Read article

» More climate articles

CLEAN ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

Rocky Mountain Power prepares to operate largest US residential battery demand response project
Sonnen and the utility are partnering to build a virtual power plant at the new 600-unit apartment complex, with 12.6 MWh of energy capacity from a 5.2 MW solar array.
Robert Walton, Utility Dive
August 27, 2019

Each of the 600 apartment units will come with efficient appliances and a Sonnen battery — powered by solar panels on top of all 22 buildings in the complex. RMP will manage the batteries as a Virtual Power Plant (VPP) capable of operating as a grid resource. Once fully operational, the utility says Soleil Lofts will be the largest residential battery demand response project in the United States.
» Read article

Haddad: Federal delay of Vineyard Wind ‘discouraging’; Anbaric committed to Brayton Point
By Peter Jasinski, The Herald News, in South Coast Today
August 26, 2019

The proposed $2.8 billion, 800-megawatt wind farm off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard hit a delay when the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management announced that a cumulative impacts analysis was needed before the project will be issued a required permit. The decision has put the project’s end date in question, with some speculating that a decision on the permit might not be made until next December.

Brayton Point had been touted by the likes of U.S. Sen. Ed Markey as becoming a potential hub for New England’s wind energy industry earlier this year. Plans are ongoing to convert the former coal-fired power plant property at Brayton Point into a site where businesses affiliated with Vineyard Wind could open.

The Wakefield-based company Anbaric has already announced its plans to build a $645 million energy conversion and storage facility that would serve as the “plug-in” between offshore wind farms and the power grid on the mainland.

“The project is an important first step to building this industry in southern New England,” the company said in the statement. “As for Anbaric, we remain focused on Brayton Point and working with the state and stakeholders to issue request for proposals that create the necessary transmission infrastructure to create a first-class wind industry on the SouthCoast and beyond.”
» Read article

Bay State Wind submits second proposal for wind farm in Martha’s Vineyard
By Douglas Hook, MassLive
August 26, 2019

The proposed wind farm is an 84-turbine, 800-megawatt farm, 14 nautical miles from Martha’s Vineyard off the coast of Mass.

This could power up to 500,000 homes, create up to 1,200 new jobs within the commonwealth during construction and up to 10,800 direct and indirect jobs over the life of the project.
» Read article

Solar panels could be cash crop for farmers
By Jay Greene, Craine’s Detroit Business
August 25, 2019

Despite some criticism from some fellow farmers and massive red tape before power generation starts, Forell and Kraynak used a change in [Michigan] Public Act 116 that allows them to keep their long-term agricultural tax incentives while renting their land for solar power development under the state Farmland and Open Space Preservation program.
» Read article

» More clean energy alternatives articles

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

Alice - Eviation
6 electric aviation companies to watch
By Shane Downing, GreenBiz
August 20, 2019

Although a day when travelers can crisscross the world in all-electric commercial jets may seem a lifetime away, roughly 45 percent of global flights are under 500 miles, putting almost half of all flights within the range of an electric motor. In a place such as the United States, where the aviation industry contributes 12 percent of all carbon emissions, that’s a big opportunity to reduce emissions.
» Read article

zeppelin
Zeppelins stopped flying after the Hindenburg disaster. Now scientists want to bring them back.
The proposed airships would move cargo more efficiently than oceangoing freighters — and produce far less pollution.
By Jeremy Deaton, NBC News
August 19, 2019

The age of huge, ocean-crossing zeppelins came to an end in 1937, when the Hindenburg — the largest craft of its type ever built — erupted in flames while landing in New Jersey. Dozens died.

Now, more than 80 years later, the giant airships may be poised for a comeback — not for passenger service, but as an environmentally friendly means of delivering goods around the globe.

As proposed in a recent scientific paper, the new airships would be 10 times bigger than the 800-foot Hindenburg — more than five times as long as the Empire State Building is tall — and soar high in the atmosphere. They’d do the work of traditional oceangoing cargo ships but would take less time and generate only a fraction of the pollution.
» Read article

» More clean transportation articles

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY NEWS

Air Monitoring Reveals Troubling Benzene Spikes Officials Don’t Fully Understand
Residents in South Portland, Maine, packed a meeting to find out about the noxious fumes fouling the air they breathe. The news, one official said, was bad.
By Sabrina Shankman, InsideClimate News
August 23, 2019

With 120 petroleum storage tanks scattered along the city’s shores and a regular stream of tankers coming and going, it’s no secret that the fossil fuel industry has a big presence here. But no one really started asking questions about the health implications of the fumes until March, when the city learned that Global Partners was being fined by the EPA for violating the Clean Air Act. Its tanks, which contain asphalt and bunker fuel, had the potential to emit twice the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than its permit allowed.

It wasn’t long before the city learned that a second company, Sprague, had been issued a notice of violation for the same thing.

City leaders, caught off-guard by the announcement of a settlement between the EPA and Global Partners, jumped into action. They met with the state and the companies, and they  launched the air monitoring program to start to understand the scope of the problem.
» Read article

» More fossil fuel industry articles

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

epa pipeline rule
EPA proposes rolling back states’ authority over pipeline projects
By Rebecca Beitsch, The Hill
August 9, 2019

Democrats, environmentalists and state officials have lambasted a new proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that would limit states’ ability to stall the construction of pipelines.

The regulation targets a portion of the Clean Water Act known as Section 401, which states have used to block controversial pipeline projects, arguing they pose a risk of contaminating drinking water.

The Trump administration proposal would cement guidance issued in June that critics say seeks to limit states’ influence over controversial pipeline projects.

The Clean Water Act essentially gives states veto power over large projects that cut through their rivers and streams, giving them a year to weigh permits and determine how projects would impact their water quality.

Democratic-held states are already vowing to take legal action if the rule is finalized.

States have recently sidelined two large projects using the certification process through the Clean Water Act, actions that contradict the energy dominance strategy promoted by the Trump administration.

New York denied a certification for the Constitution Pipeline, a 124-mile natural gas pipeline that would have run from Pennsylvania to New York, crossing rivers more than 200 times. Washington state also denied certification for the Millennium Coal Terminal, a shipping port for large stocks of coal.
» Read article

» More EPA articles

PLASTICS BANS

Do plastic bag taxes or bans curb waste? 400 cities and states tried it out.
And will it work for plastic straws?
By Matthew Zeitlin, Vox
August 27, 2019

Plastic bags are forever. The thin sacks that hold our groceries, toothpaste, and takeout meals have little hope of being recycled, and instead just might be reused as liners for our trash cans or containers for our dogs’ waste, after which they find themselves either blown into storm drains and rivers or hopelessly clogging landfills. According to one 2009 estimate, some 100 billion of these bags were used a year in the United States and somewhere between 500 million and 1.5 trillion worldwide.

More than 400 laws and ordinances across the country ban or tax plastic bags, according to Jennie Romer, an attorney at the Surfrider Foundation and a leading advocate and expert on plastic bag policies. The bans actually started outside the United States, with Bangladesh banning them countrywide in 2002 and Pakistan announcing recently that it, too, will ban single-use plastic bags. “Our slight change in habits will do miracles for future generations,” one politician wrote.

While a straightforward ban may seem like the most effective way to stop people from using plastic, researchers and consultants suggest another strategy is working better: a tax on all non-reusable bags, which may or may not be combined with an outright ban on some plastic.
» Read article

» More plastics ban articles

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Weekly News Check-In 7/26/19

Welcome back.

Here’s a distillation of the most interesting and useful news we uncovered this week – from local to global.

This edition includes articles from the Weymouth Compressor Station and Granite Bridge pipeline fights; news about climate, clean energy alternatives, and clean transportation; and the latest from the fossil fuel industry and the battle against industrial scale biomass.

The blog editor is taking a week off – please watch for our next post on August 9th.

— The NFGiM Team

 

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

Gas company misses deadline for testing soil at Weymouth site
By Jessica Trufant, The Patriot Ledger
July 22, 2019

Residents and officials fighting a proposed natural-gas compressor station on the banks of the Fore River say it’s unlikely that construction of the controversial project could start this year after the gas company missed a deadline to submit additional hazardous waste soil testing.

The state Department of Environmental Protection last week entered into an administrative consent order with Algonquin Gas Transmission, a subsidiary of Spectra Energy-Enbridge, to submit by Jan. 17, 2020, more environmental sampling and analysis related to hazardous waste cleanup of the site. Algonquin missed the first deadline of July 19.
» Read article   

FRRACS TV ad
Compressor TV ad urges governor to oppose facility
By Ed Baker, Wicked Local Weymouth
July 19, 2019

Opponents of a proposed compressor station in the Fore River Basin are urging people to ask Gov. Charlie Baker to speak out against the facility in a new 30-second TV infomercial.

“We are encouraging people to get involved,” said Alice Arena, leader of the Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station. “We still have a big fight going on here.”

“Citing a compressor station in the middle of thousands of homes in Weymouth, Braintree and Quincy is by far the most irresponsible proposal a natural gas company has presented the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,” Haugh said during the online advertisement. “Residents and local officials have fought for years against this proposal, but we need more help. We need Gov. Charlie Baker to speak out the Weymouth compressor station.”

The infomercial features a woman exclaiming, “Gov. Baker, where are you sir?” and the message ends with details about how to oppose the facility by reviewing FRRACS’s website.
» Read article   

» More Weymouth compressor station articles

 

GRANITE BRIDGE PIPELINE

Liberty Utilities to make case for liquefied natural gas tank in Epping
Seacost Online
July 18, 2019

Liberty Utilities will host a safety demonstration of liquefied natural gas Wednesday, July 31 with expert Erik Neandross at the Epping Middle School gymnasium.

The demonstration comes as Liberty Utilities continues to work to gain approval to construct an LNG storage facility in West Epping as part of its proposed Granite Bridge project.
» Read article

» More Granite Bridge Pipeline articles

 

CLIMATE

Arctic Wildfires
Huge swathes of the Arctic on fire, ‘unprecedented’ satellite images show
Earth’s boreal forests now burning at rate unseen in ‘at least 10,000 years’, scientists warn
Harry Cockburn, the Independent
July 23, 2019

Vast swathes of the Arctic are suffering from “unprecedented” wildfires, new satellite images have revealed.

North of the Arctic circle, the high temperatures are facilitating enormous wildfires which are wreaking ecological destruction on a colossal scale.

It comes after the world’s hottest June on record which has been followed by a devastating heatwave in the US, with Europe forecast for the same treatment later this week.
» Read article   

Major U.S. cities are leaking methane at twice the rate previously believed
By Sid Perkins, Science Magazine
Jul. 19, 2019

The new findings come courtesy of data gathered by aircraft over six U.S. cities: Washington, D.C.; Baltimore, Maryland; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; New York City; Providence; and Boston. In 2018, researchers flew at altitudes between 300 and 800 meters and measured concentrations of methane, ethane, CO2, and carbon monoxide, among other gases.

It’s also much more than the amounts estimated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A 2016 report suggested methane emissions in the six major urban areas the researchers studied totaled only 370,000 tons. “It’s easy to say that the EPA inventory is low, but it’s not as easy to say why it’s low,” Kort says. One possible reason for this huge discrepancy: The EPA estimate includes leaks from the natural gas distribution system, but it doesn’t include leaks from homes and businesses. Those “beyond the meter” emissions could include, for example, tiny whooshes of incompletely burned methane from home appliances such as gas stoves, furnaces, and hot water heaters. Taken together over a city of millions, such emissions could be substantial.

The team’s results are “a confirmation and expansion” of what was already known from smaller-scale studies in the Boston and the Washington, D.C.–Baltimore areas, says Steven Wofsy, an atmospheric chemist at Harvard University, who wasn’t involved in the new analysis. The new study, conducted over six metropolitan areas, “shows this is not an isolated phenomenon,” he adds.
» Read article  

Days of 100-Degree Heat Will Become Weeks as Climate Warms, U.S. Study Warns
By Kristoffer Tigue, Inside Climate News
July 17, 2019

Nearly every part of the United States will face a significant increase in extremely hot days by mid-century, even if some action is taken to reduce greenhouse emissions, a new study says. If nothing is done to rein in climate change, it warns, the impact will be worse.

It found that the number of days when the average temperature will feel like 100 degrees in the Lower 48 states will more than double, from about two weeks at the end of the last century to 30 days by mid-century, even with some efforts to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that drive global warming.

And the number of days with a heat index of 105°F or more will more than triple to nearly three weeks, the study found.
» Read article   

Climate change will kill us with heat if nothing is done to fix it, study says
By Steve Marroni, Penn Live
July 16, 2019

The number of dangerously hot days per year will skyrocket this century if little or nothing is done about climate change, putting millions of Americans at risk.

Those are the findings released today by the Union of Concerned Scientists in their report, “Killer Heat in the United States: Climate Choices and the Future of Dangerously Hot Days.”

The group says climate change is already manifesting itself in the form of deadlier storms, rising sea levels, droughts, wildfires and floods, but the heat extremes forecast in their analysis of the rest of the 21st Century shows an intensity of heat that will affect the daily lives of more Americans than ever before.
» Read article  

Could Climate Change Spark a Financial Crisis? Candidates Warn Fed It’s a Risk
By John Lippert, Inside Climate News
July 15, 2019

A few of the Democrats running for president have started warning about climate change in a way that voters rarely think about yet can profoundly affect their lives. To sum it up: If you think the housing crisis was bad, wait until you see how the climate crisis plays out for financial markets.

The candidates are urging the Federal Reserve—the United States’ central bank—to work with financial institutions around the world to confront climate risks that could trigger cascading collapses.

They also want regulators to ensure that America’s financial system is resilient to the impacts of climate change.

It’s not just that fossil fuel projects, like other infrastructure investments, are at risk from severe weather events, a risk that lenders and insurance companies must shoulder. It’s also that when the world finally weans itself away from the fossil fuels whose use is driving global warming, the business models of some of the most heavily capitalized world industries could crumble along with demand for their products.
» Read article   

» More climate articles

 

CLEAN ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

Mass. delegation pushing to advance Vineyard Wind
By Michael P. Norton / State House News Service in Southcoast Today
July 24, 2019

Members of Congress have become involved in trying to move Vineyard Wind forward, a top Baker administration official said Tuesday, as lobbying intensifies to advance what state officials hope will be the nation’s first commercial-scale offshore wind project.

Energy and Environmental Affairs Undersecretary Patrick Woodcock told members of the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Board earlier this week about the involvement of members of Congress since the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management indicated it would not decide on a key project approval this month, as anticipated.

Project officials last week indicated the entire effort is at risk without a favorable federal response by the end of August. Federal officials say they are operating within a review window that extends to March 2020.
» Read article   

State lawmakers advance Vineyard Wind project
The Barnstable Patriot
July 23, 2019

Vineyard Wind continues to undergo an extensive and comprehensive public and regulatory review process that involves evaluation by more than 25 federal, state, and local regulatory bodies, including the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, the Army Corps of Engineers, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the Cape Cod Commission, the Martha’s Vineyard Commission, and local conservation commissions.

To date, Vineyard Wind has received permits or approvals from the Massachusetts Energy Facilities Siting Board (EFSB), an independent state board responsible for review of proposed large energy facilities, the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act office, the Cape Cod Commission, the Barnstable Conservation Commission, the Martha’s Vineyard Conservation Commission, and the Nantucket Conservation Commission.
» Read article   

Project Update: Massachusetts Legislature Enacts Bipartisan Legislation to Advance Vineyard Wind Project
Vinyard Wind Press Release
July 23, 2019

The Massachusetts Legislature has enacted bi-partisan legislation co-sponsored by Senator Julian Cyr (D – Truro) and Rep. William L. Crocker (R – Barnstable) authorizing the Barnstable Town Council to grant an easement for a portion of Covell’s Beach that will allow for construction of the interconnection between Vineyard Wind, the United States’ first large-scale wind farm, and the New England power grid.The legislative vote follows a Host Community Agreement (HCA) between the Town of Barnstable and Vineyard Wind, which was unanimously supported by the Barnstable Town Council in October 2018.

The HCA includes annual payments to the Town of at least $1.534 million each year in combined property taxes and host community payments, totaling a guaranteed $16 million in Host Community Payments. The Town Council has dedicated those resources to municipal water protection efforts.
» Read article   

State net-zero carbon goal under review
By Matt Murphy, State House News Service, Worcester Telegram
July 23, 2019

… a group of 25 lawmakers, led by Reps. Majorie Decker of Cambridge and Sean Garballey of Arlington, appeared in support of a Decker-Garballey bill to convert to 100% renewable energy by 2045.

The bill would also set a target of 100% renewable energy in the electricity sector by 2035.

“What has happened is we have states who now must lead on this issue because the federal government is not only doing nothing about it, but doing everything they can to deny science,” Garballey said.

Garballey called it “a shame” that states like California, New York and Hawaii have committed themselves to achieving a 100% renewable electric system and Massachusetts hasn’t. In addition to helping fight the effects of climate change, Garballey said the transition will be a huge engine for job growth.
» Read article

» More clean energy alternatives articles

 

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

Auto agreement with CA
Automakers, Rejecting Trump Pollution Rule, Strike a Deal With California
By Coral Davenport and Hiroko Tabuchi, New York Times
July 25, 2019

In coming weeks, the Trump administration is expected to all but eliminate an Obama-era regulation designed to reduce vehicle emissions that contribute to global warming. California and 13 other states have vowed to keep enforcing the stricter rules, potentially splitting the United States auto market in two.

With car companies facing the prospect of having to build two separate lineups of vehicles, they opened secretive talks with California regulators in which the automakers — Ford Motor Company, Volkswagen of America, Honda and BMW — won rules that are slightly less restrictive than the Obama standards and that they can apply to vehicles sold nationwide.

The agreement provides “much-needed regulatory certainty,” the companies said in a joint statement, while enabling them to “meet both federal and state requirements with a single national fleet, avoiding a patchwork of regulations.”
» Read article   

Long distance solar EV Lightyear One has 725 km range
By Electrive.com
June 25, 2019

“The main goal of this car is to go where electric cars reach their limits,” says Lex Hoefsloot, CEO and co-founder of Lightyear. “Research has shown that range and lack of charging capability are still the biggest concerns with electric mobility.”

That’s why the car’s roof and hood are made of five square meters of safety glass solar cells. This should be so stable that an “adult man can walk on them without causing bumps”. According to a calculator on the company’s website, the solar cells will be able to generate electricity for a range of up to 33 kilometres a day (seven kilometres in winter).
» Read article  

» More clean transportation articles

 

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY

U.S. Shale Is Doomed No Matter What They Do
By Nick Cunningham, Oilpriice.com
July 21, 2019

With financial stress setting in for U.S. shale companies, some are trying to drill their way out of the problem, while others are hoping to boost profitability by cutting costs and implementing spending restraint. Both approaches are riddled with risk.

There are [a] few reasons why natural gas prices might not rebound. For instance, any increase in natural gas prices will only induce more renewable energy. Costs for solar, wind and even energy storage has plunged. For years, natural gas was the cheapest option, but that is no longer the case. Renewable energy increasingly beats out gas on price, which means that natural gas prices will run into resistance when they start to rise as demand would inevitably slow.

A second reason why prices might not rise is because public policy is beginning to really work against the gas industry. IEEFA pointed to the recent decision in New York to block the construction of Williams Co.’s pipeline that would have connected Appalachian gas to New York City. In fact, New York seems to be heading in a different direction, recently passing one of the most ambitious and comprehensive pieces of climate and energy bills in the nation. Or, look to Berkeley, California, which just became the first city in the country to ban the installation of natural gas lines in new homes. As public policy increasingly targets the demand side of the equation, natural gas prices face downward pressure.
» Read article

Babies Born Near Oil and Gas Wells Are Up to 70% More Likely to Have Congenital Heart Defects, New Study Shows
By Julia Conley, Common Dream
July 19, 2019

Led by Dr. Lisa McKenzie at the University of Colorado, researchers found that the chemicals released from oil and gas wells can have serious and potentially fatal effects on babies born to mothers who live within a mile of an active well site—as about 17 million Americans do.

The researchers studied more than 3,000 newborns who were born in Colorado between 2005 and 2011. The state is home to about 60,000 fracking sites, according to the grassroots group Colorado Rising. In areas with the highest intensity of oil and gas extraction activity, mothers were 40 to 70 percent more likely to give birth to babies with congenital heart defects (CHDs).

“We observed more children were being born with a congenital heart defect in areas with the highest intensity of oil and gas well activity,” said McKenzie in a statement.
» Read article  

Study from CU Anschutz researchers suggests link between oil and gas density, child heart defects
Industry claims researchers’ science is “misleading”
By Jennifer Kovaleski , Blair Miller, Denver Channel 7
July 18, 2019

A study from three University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus researchers funded by the American Heart Association published Wednesday in a peer-reviewed science journal found suggestions that babies born to mothers who live in areas with high oil and gas development are more likely to have congenital heart defects than those born outside of high-density areas.
» Read article   

GE Gas Turbine
GE gas plant to close 20 years early, become battery storage site — sign of the times?
By Phil Dzikiy, Electrek
June 24, 2019

General Electric will demolish a California natural gas-fired plant with 20 years remaining in its useful life, deeming the plant “uneconomical” as inexpensive solar and wind grab a larger share of power in the state.

The Inland Empire Energy Center (IEEC), a 750 megawatt plant, is slated for closure by the end of the year. GE told Reuters, “We have made the decision to shut down operation of the Inland Empire Power Plant, which has been operating below capacity for several years, effective at the end of 2019.”

The complete Inland Empire Energy Center Decommissioning and Demolition Plan has been published on the commission’s website. It notes that IEEC is selling the project site to Nova Power “for the purpose of developing a battery energy storage system (BESS).”

The plant relies on GE’s H-Class turbines, which is now considered a legacy technology. Experts told Reuters the turbine has a number of technical issues. GE noted the plant is now “uneconomical to support further.”

GE’s plant was first approved in 2003 and only came online about a decade ago, according to the California Energy Commission. Now the plant is set to close, only having gone through one-third of its designed useful life.
» Read article   

» More fossil fuel industry articles   

 

BIOMASS

As I See It: Burning wood no way to fight climate change
By Nisha Swinton and Regina LaRocque , Opinion: Worcester Telegram
July 19, 2019

A 2018 law sets a course for slowly expanding Massachusetts’ renewable portfolio standard (RPS). These state-based programs are among the most effective tools we have to encourage more clean energy. But when they are poorly designed, they can actually throw money at dirty power sources — anything from burning wood to animal waste and landfill gas. The current proposal would benefit powerful special interests, spew carbon into the atmosphere, and leave nearby communities to suffer from the effects of increased air pollution.

Increasing the burning of biomass is not a transition to clean renewable energy, but rather a dangerous distraction that will cost ratepayers money while undermining efforts to enact real clean energy policies. Rep. Denise Provost has introduced a bill that would remove biomass from the state’s Alternative Portfolio Standards program. Passing that bill would be a good start; but Gov. Baker should withdraw this proposal and implement a plan to stop the expansion of dirty energy sources that pollute our air and warm our planet.
» Read article   

Columnist Lindsay Sabadosa: Racism is not just about words
Daily Hampshire Gazzette
July 16, 2019

… the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) has recently proposed changes that would allow electricity retailers to meet increased renewable energy goals by purchasing energy from polluting biomass power plants.

This would fly in the face of the stringent science-based standards Massachusetts adopted in 2012 that recognized the environmental and public health impacts of biomass energy. Massachusetts is currently the only state in the nation that considers greenhouse gas emissions as criteria for biomass eligibility in its renewable portfolio standard, and only highly efficient plants can qualify.

The proposed regulations would roll this back without any science-based justification for the change, at a time when climate scientists are telling us we need to do more to protect our forests and reduce our carbon emissions.

How does that relate to anti-racist policies and environmental justice? Western Massachusetts, home to some of the poorest and most disenfranchised communities in the state, would be the most affected and likely the location of any new biomass plant.

DOER’s proposed changes would ensure that the Palmer biomass plant proposed in East Springfield would qualify for $5 million to $10 million per year in renewable energy credits, in perpetuity, while adding more air pollution to a low-income community that already suffers alarmingly high rates of asthma, heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other chronic health problems.
» Read article   

» More biomass articles   

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Weekly News Check-In 6/28/19


Welcome back.

Each week we scour news outlets for articles related to energy, climate, and the transition to a carbon-free economy. We also cover related issues, like plastics and biomass. Here’s a distillation of the most interesting and useful news uncovered this week – from local to global.

— The NFGiM Team

CLIMATE

It’s so hot in Europe, the temperature map is screaming
By Miyo McGinn, Grist
June 26, 2019

Screaming hot
This week’s weather is being compared to the 2003 heatwave that was responsible for over 30,000 deaths across Western Europe — mostly of the sickly, elderly, and homeless — and estimated financial losses of over 13 billions euros ($14.8 billion).

The only reported casualties of the heat so far are three elderly French people who died after suffering cardiac arrests while swimming today, prompting officials to issue statements warning the public of the dangers of jumping into cold water when it’s so hot.

Unfortunately, this is just the start — the heatwave is expected to continue through next week, and governments are preparing for water shortages, increased risk of fires, and an influx of hospitalizations from dehydration and overheating as temperatures creep higher in the coming days.
» Read article  

As Coal Fades in the U.S., Natural Gas Becomes the Climate Battleground
By Brad Plumer, New York Times
June 26, 2019

Nationwide, energy companies plan to add at least 150 new gas plants and thousands of miles of pipelines in the years ahead.

A rush to build gas-fired plants, even though they emit only half as much carbon pollution as coal, has the potential to lock in decades of new fossil-fuel use right as scientists say emissions need to fall drastically by midcentury to avert the worst impacts of global warming.
» Read article

77 Health Organizations Call for Climate Action to Fight Public Health Emergency
By Olivia Rosane, Eco Watch
June 25, 2019

“We are here today to declare that climate change is a health emergency. Climate change is already harming the health, safety and wellbeing of every American living today and if it is not addressed, will bring untold harm to all our children and grandchildren,” former Acting Surgeon General and Retired U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak said in a transcript of a press call emailed to EcoWatch.
» Read article 

‘Climate apartheid’: UN expert says human rights may not survive
Right to life is likely to be undermined alongside the rule of law, special rapporteur says
By Damian Carrington, Environment editor, The Guardian
June 25, 2019

The world is increasingly at risk of “climate apartheid”, where the rich pay to escape heat and hunger caused by the escalating climate crisis while the rest of the world suffers, a report from a UN human rights expert has said.

Philip Alston, UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, said the impacts of global heating are likely to undermine not only basic rights to life, water, food, and housing for hundreds of millions of people, but also democracy and the rule of law.

Alston is critical of the “patently inadequate” steps taken by the UN itself, countries, NGOs and businesses, saying they are “entirely disproportionate to the urgency and magnitude of the threat”. His report to the UN human rights council (HRC) concludes: “Human rights might not survive the coming upheaval.”
» Read article 

Trump administration issues guidance for federal agencies to weigh climate impacts
By Valerie Volcovici, Reuters
June 21, 2019

“Time and time again, courts are ordering agencies to consider the impacts of climate change in their environmental reviews,” said Christy Goldfuss, former CEQ chair during the Obama administration. “With record-breaking storms and the recent devastating floods in the Midwest, climate impacts are looming large – the Federal government ignores them at their own peril.”
» Read article 

White House tells agencies they no longer have to weigh a project’s long-term climate impacts
By Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post
June 21, 2019

The move, which comes two days after the Environmental Protection Agency scaled back greenhouse gas requirements for power plants, is the Trump administration’s latest effort to sideline climate considerations in federal decision-making. But legal experts warned it could cause further problems for the administration in court, where judges have suggested officials need to do a better job of assessing the climate impact of their decisions.
» Read article

Clean Power Plan replacement triggers rush to court
Climate activists say they expect to have the Affordable Clean Energy rule invalidated in court.
By Robert Walton, Utility Dive
June 20, 2019

Environmental advocates and state attorneys general on Wednesday signaled they would file lawsuits to block the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule, which they say will be significantly less effective than the Obama-era Clean Power Plan it replaces.

The EPA finalized the rule on Wednesday, and as a result expects carbon emissions from the electric sector to fall by as much as 35% below 2005 levels by 2030. But opponents of the new rule say updates to power sector regulations should result in far greater decarbonization, and by failing to consider more effective emission control options the agency violated the Clean Air Act.
» Read article 

India weather: Temperature passes 50C Celsius in northern India
(*123.8°F)
By News Corp Australia
June 3, 2019

Temperatures passed 50 degrees Celsius in northern India as an unrelenting heatwave triggered warnings of water shortages and heatstroke. The thermometer hit 50.6 degrees Celsius in the Rajasthan desert city of Churu over the weekend, the weather department said.

The Indian Meteorological Department said severe heat could stay for up to a week across Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh states. Several deaths from heatstroke have already been recorded. About 200 million people live in northern India.
» Read article 

» More climate articles

CLEAN ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

For the first time, the U.S. got more electricity from renewables than coal
By Irina Ivanova, CBS News
June 27, 2019

For the first time, the U.S. has generated more energy from renewables than from coal, marking a landmark for non-polluting energy.

A full 22% of the electricity generated in the U.S. in April came from renewable sources like wind, solar, hydroelectric and geothermal power, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, which released the official figures this week after early projections emerged in May. Just 20% of power production in April came from coal. The shift away from King Coal is due to seasonal factors as well as a long-running decline in the number of U.S. coal plants.
» Read article  

Nuclear Power & Natural Gas Hit A Wall In US: Now What?
By Tina Casey, Clean Technica
June 22, 2019

Two developments in the US energy landscape this week call into question the “clean energy” status of nuclear power and natural gas, too. In Rhode Island, state officials torpedoed a proposed natural gas power plant after a massive wave of public opposition. Meanwhile, federal officials greenlighted the sale of New Jersey’s Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in New Jersey to the company Holtec Decommissioning International, which will take it down atom by atom. So, now what?
» Read article  

Engineers lead study for replacing natural gas
By Real Estate Weekly
June 21, 2019

BuroHappold Engineering has been selected by local nonprofit Home Energy Efficiency Team (HEET) to lead the development of an GeoMicroDistrict Feasibility Study, which will explore the potential of replacing natural gas infrastructure with a network of neighborhood-scale district heating systems, or “GeoMicroDistricts.”

The goal of the Study is to assess the feasibility of designing, developing, implementing, and scaling up these systems in the Greater Boston area to reduce reliance on natural gas and move towards renewable energy sources.

It will focus on the use of ground-source heat pump technology, which uses electricity to transfer heat from the ground to a network of hot water pipes, to provide heating, and potentially cooling, for the buildings within each District.

Ground-source heat pump technology is highly efficient and, when paired with clean electricity, is considered a renewable heat source. HEET is scheduled to release the final plan in the early fall of 2019.
» Read article  

Congress pushes for storage, renewables to have same private investment incentives as fossil fuels
By Robert Walton, Utility Dive
June 17, 2019

“Clean energy technologies have made tremendous progress in the last several decades, and they deserve the same shot at success in the market as traditional energy projects have experienced through the federal tax code,” Coons said in a statement.

Updating the tax code “levels the playing field” for a wide array of energy sources, said Coons. “Clean and traditional alike.”
» Read article   

» More clean energy alternatives articles

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

State Funding For Electric Vehicle Rebates Dries Up
By Craig LeMoult, WGBH News
June 24, 2019

After September, Massachusetts won’t give rebates to people who buy electric vehicles. The state program behind the rebates is running out of money.

For the last five years, the state has been giving $1,500 rebates to people who buy electric vehicles. The MOR-EV program has given over $30 million to more than 14,000 electric vehicle buyers. But as electric vehicles get more popular, money for the program has been running dry, and state lawmakers have failed to extend the program.
» Read article 

To compete in the global battery arms race, the US must spur its domestic market, analysts say
Industry experts say the United States has to create incentives for lithium-ion battery products to encourage manufacturers and decrease its dependence on Chinese imports.
By HJ Mai, Utility Dive
June 24, 2019

Spurred by increased global demand for electric vehicles (EVs), energy storage systems and consumer electronics, lithium-ion batteries have become invaluable in today’s global society. And while China recognized early on the importance of establishing a manufacturing base, the U.S. failed to take a similar approach.

The result of those decisions is market dominance on one side and a heavy dependency on imports on the other. To close America’s gap in the battery production sector, industry experts told Utility Dive that having a reliable domestic market driven by government incentives is key to challenge China’s superiority.
» Read article  

Green is the New Black with Asphalt Made from Algae
The next generation of roads might be made from discarded plant product rather than oil-based bitumen.
By Jessica Lombardo, forconstructionpros.com
May 29, 2015

This innovation offers a new possible option for the road building industry, which is entirely dependent on petroleum today. The types of bioasphalt developed so far relied on oils of agricultural origin (which could be needed for human nutrition) or from the paper industry, mixed with resins to improve their viscoelastic properties. Microalgae cultivation does not require the use of arable land so it offers an attractive solution.
» Read article 

» More clean transportation articles

NATURAL GAS HEALTH RISKS

Health officials want studies of natural gas projects
By Christian M. Wade, Statehouse News
June 25, 2019

While many of the battles over pipeline expansions have largely focused on environmental costs and safety concerns, officials say health risks shouldn’t be overlooked.

Steve Jones, a retired physician and volunteer for the Sierra Club, said many people just aren’t aware of the serious health risks.

“Those familiar blue flames on a gas stove produce nitrogen dioxide, which is a potent respiratory irritant,” he said at Tuesday’s briefing. “Unfortunately many parents, public health staff and boards of health do not know that gas stove cooking increases the risk of asthma.”
» Read article 

» More natural gas health risk articles

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY

Shale Pioneer: Fracking is an “Unmitigated Disaster”
By Nick Cunningham, Oil Price
June 24, 2019

Fracking has been an “unmitigated disaster” for shale companies themselves, according to a prominent former shale executive.

“The shale gas revolution has frankly been an unmitigated disaster for any buy-and-hold investor in the shale gas industry with very few limited exceptions,” Steve Schlotterbeck, former chief executive of EQT, a shale gas giant, said at a petrochemicals conference in Pittsburgh. “In fact, I’m not aware of another case of a disruptive technological change that has done so much harm to the industry that created the change.”

He did not pull any punches. “While hundreds of billions of dollars of benefits have accrued to hundreds of millions of people, the amount of shareholder value destruction registers in the hundreds of billions of dollars,” he said. “The industry is self-destructive.”
» Read article 

U.S. Natural Gas Prices Have Collapsed
By Jude Clemente, Forbes
June 23, 2019

U.S. natural gas prices have collapsed since Memorial Day. The prompt month NYMEX gas contract is down over 16% so far in June.

Natural gas is at its lowest price level since May 2016. Now around $2.20 per MMBtu, gas this time last year was ~$3.00. Nobody saw this coming, especially when prices in mid-November spiked to nearly $5.00.
» Read article  

Former Shale Gas CEO Says Fracking Revolution Has Been ‘A Disaster’ For Drillers, Investors
By Sharon Kelly, DeSmog Blog
June 23, 2019
“Excluding capital, the big eight basin producers have destroyed on average 80 percent of the value of their companies since the beginning of the shale revolution,” Schlotterbeck said. “This is not the fall from the peak price during the shale decade, this is the drop in their share price from before the shale revolution began.”

Mr. Schlotterbeck credited the shale rush with lowering power and natural gas bills nationwide and offering significant economic benefits since 2008, when he said the shale revolution began.

“Nearly every American has benefited from shale gas, with one big exception,” he said, “the shale gas investors.”

Residents of communities where shale gas drilling and fracking have caused disruptions and health issues might take exception to Mr. Schlotterbeck’s categorical description of the beneficiaries of shale gas, as might climate scientists who have warned that the shale industry’s greenhouse gas emissions are so severe that burning gas for power may be worse for the global climate than burning coal.
» Read article 

» More fossil fuel industry articles

ATLANTIC BRIDGE PIPELINE & WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

State adjudicator OKs Weymouth compressor station air permit
By Jessica Trufant, The Patriot Ledger
June 27, 2019

Opponents of a natural gas compressor station proposed for a site in Weymouth were dealt another blow Thursday as a state adjudicator recommended the approval of an air-quality permit for the project.

Hearing officer Jane Rothchild of the state Department of Environmental Protection said the department should uphold a permit issued to gas company Spectra Energy-Enbridge and reject an appeal filed by Weymouth, Quincy, Braintree, Hingham and a citizens group, which together had argued that the proposed station would worsen air pollution in the Fore River Basin and endanger the lives of nearby residents.

South Shore legislators and U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch called on Rothchild to reject the plan so the project can be vetted based on all the evidence.

Instead, Rothchild allowed the permit with slight modifications. For example, she recommended that Weymouth, Braintree, Hingham and Quincy be notified prior to a substantial blow down, or release of natural gas. She also suggested limiting blow downs to two per year.
Blog editor’s note – I feel a need to point out the absurdity of those last two sentences. First, are residents and people who work or go to school in this neighborhood supposed to evacuate during blowdown days? Second, a compressor station performs blowdowns based on system requirements, not based on some predetermined, limited, annual schedule. It’s about physics, not event planning….
» Read article

Activists use art to draw attention to Weymouth compressor controversy
By Joe DiFazio,The Patriot Ledger
June 23, 2019

It couldn’t have been a more picture perfect day Sunday for organizers of Painting in the Park, an event at King’s Park in Weymouth held by activists opposed to a proposed natural gas compressor station along the Fore River. Organizers said they wanted to promote the beauty of the park they fear would be destroyed by putting a compressor station next to it.

Margaret Bellafiore, an art teacher from Weymouth who is also on the board of Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station (FRRACS), said the event was art activism.

“We’re using art to show the cause,” Bellafiore said. “This is a beautiful spot, we want to keep it this way. We don’t want the compressor built.”
» Read article

» More Weymouth compressor station articles  

ELECTRIC UTILITIES

Here Comes the World’s Biggest Virtual Power Plant — And it’s Behind the Meter
By Elisa Wood, Microgrid Knowledge
June 20, 2019

The project will aggregate 10,000 distributed energy assets which, as one resource, will sell power into the nation’s wholesale energy market, still short on capacity from the loss of the Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011.

The Japanese virtual power plant will initially use only batteries, but at a future date can incorporate other various distributed energy assets, such as solar, electric vehicle chargers and smart home thermostats, said Sternberg in an interview with Microgrid Knowledge. The project also has the capability to be configured into a microgrid, although that is not part of the current plan.

“This type of technology is coming to the US sooner rather than later,”
» Read article

» More electric utilities articles

FERC

FERC commissioner LaFleur to leave late August, restoring Republican majority
By Maya Weber, S&P Global
June 20, 2019

With a majority at the commission, Republicans will have more power, unless further checked by the courts, to confine GHG considerations in gas project reviews to emissions directly tied to the projects. LaFleur and fellow Democrat Richard Glick have argued for further consideration of upstream and downstream indirect emissions, such as those associated with gas production or end-use combustion.
» Read article  

 » More FERC articles

BIOMASS

Editorial: The right to live without environmental pollution
By Greenfield Recorder
June 21, 2019

Earlier this year, a number of biomass-burning facilities were recipients of $3 million in state funding awarded by Gov. Charlie Baker’s administration through the Renewable Thermal Infrastructure Grant Program, an initiative focused on expanding the availability of renewable thermal technologies. Following that, the state Department of Energy Resources proposed changes to its Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS), which dictates what type of energy companies can receive government subsidies. The changes would rewrite the restrictions, allowing large wood-burning power plants to receive government funding.
» Read article 

» More biomass articles


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