Tag Archives: Highview Power

Weekly News Check-In 7/24/20

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Welcome back.

The Ashland Select Board has requested help from Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, as the town presses its opposition to the planned Eversource gas pipeline. Meanwhile, a Louisiana state appeals court ruled that the Bayou Bridge Pipeline Company “trampled” on landowner rights by starting construction without their permission. And we end the section with a recent report from Texas Public Radio on the many legal headwinds facing the Permian Highway Pipeline. This piece brought to you as an admittedly snarky counterpoint to a Kinder Morgan statement you’ll see a little farther down the page, where they claim the project is on schedule.

Greening the economy requires a plan, and Democratic lawmakers in the House Select Committee on Climate Change produced one that deserves serious consideration. We offer a good overview in podcast form, where it’s described as  effective, ambitious, and science-driven, rather than a program designed around politics. Kudos to Committee Chair Kathy Castor (D-FL) for producing a serious roadmap. Other news includes a proposal to buy out and shutter the world’s remaining coal plants – even the new ones.

Climate researches have removed some uncertainty about the extent of Earth warming related to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. A new report shows more clearly than ever what we risk by continuing with business as usual.

Massachusetts clean energy advocates suffered a setback this week, as Attorney General Maura Healey reluctantly shot down Brookline’s proposed ban on gas connections to new buildings – deferring to the building code as the ultimate authority. This illuminates the need to write gas hookup bans into the next energy efficiency stretch code – something proposed by Mass Climate Action Network’s EZ Code proposal.

Exciting news in energy storage involves long-duration “batteries” based on cooling air to its liquid state. Excess wind or solar power can drive this cooling. When electricity is needed but sun and wind aren’t cooperating, the liquid air can be expanded back to its gaseous state to spin a generating turbine. Manchester, UK will have this system soon – northern Vermont up next!

Massachusetts has completed feasibility studies of flexible community microgrids, and clean transportation is cruising along as fifteen states join California in a push to replace diesel trucks and buses.

The Great American Outdoors Act passed both chambers of Congress with broad bipartisan support and is on its way to the White House for signature. While the intent of the legislation is laudable – fully funding the Land Water Conservation Act which supports National Parks and other public lands – the money comes from the fossil fuel industry. While lawmakers congratulate themselves and news outlets gush about how wonderful it is that this involves no taxpayer money, we have to step back and wonder if there’s any real difference between locking in revenue dependence from the extraction and sale of fossil fuel, and locking in fuel dependence and emissions based on the build-out of pipelines and power plants. We can do better.

— The NFGiM Team

PIPELINES

Ashland calling AG Healey
Ashland Select Board requests AG’s aid in Eversource pipeline fight
By Cesareo Contreras, Metrowest Daily News
July 20, 2020

The Select Board has sent a letter to Attorney General Maura Healey requesting that she supports the town’s efforts in opposing Eversource Energy’s plan to replace a 3.7-mile gas transfer line that runs through town.

The letter, which was sent late last week and written by board Chair Yolanda Greaves, comes a month after Healey issued a petition calling on the Department of Public Utilities to investigate how its practices and policies affect the state’s clean energy goals.
» Read article        

BBP no trespassing
Court Rules Bayou Bridge Pipeline ‘Trampled’ Rights of Louisiana Landowners
By Dana Drugmand, DeSmog Blog
July 17, 2020

A Louisiana state appeals court has ruled that the Bayou Bridge Pipeline Company illegally “trampled” on the rights of landowners by starting pipeline construction without the landowners’ permission. The pipeline company must pay the landowners $10,000 each plus attorneys fees.

“This is a victory not only for us but for all landowners,” said Theda Larson Wright, one of the three Louisiana landowners who sued Bayou Bridge Pipeline Company (BBP) in September 2018. “All over the country, pipeline companies have destroyed people’s land, often without even attempting to get permission, and dared the landowners to speak up. Well, we did. I hope this victory will encourage many others to as well.”

The Bayou Bridge pipeline is a 163-mile pipeline through southern Louisiana carrying North Dakota crude oil to the Gulf Coast. It is the tail end of a pipeline network including the Dakota Access pipeline and is a joint venture of Energy Transfer and Phillips 66. The Bayou Bridge pipeline traverses ecologically sensitive areas such as the Atchafalaya Basin, the country’s largest river swamp, which contains old growth trees and many endangered species.
» Read article        

wrong pipeline wrong place
‘Wrong Pipeline In The Wrong Place’ — Nationwide Litigation Could Affect Permian Highway Pipeline
By Dominic Anthony Walsh, Texas Public Radio
July 6, 2020

The Keystone XL and the Dakota Access pipelines recently suffered major legal defeats — the construction permit for the Keystone XL was revoked in April, and the Dakota Access was ordered to stop pumping oil by early August. Kinder Morgan’s 430-mile Permian Highway Pipeline faces a maze of litigation, and the legal action against other pipelines around the U.S. could have ripple effects in Texas.

In the case of the Dakota Access Pipeline, a judge ruled the multi-billion dollar pipeline, partially owned by Texas-based company Energy Transfers, must complete a more thorough environmental impact study in accordance with the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA).

Jim Blackburn is an environmental lawyer and a professor at Rice University. He’s also the president of the Trinity Edwards Springs Protection Association (TESPA), which is suing Kinder Morgan for spilling 36,000 gallons of drilling fluid while constructing the Permian Highway Pipeline.

He believes Kinder Morgan — a multibillion dollar company — and the Army Corps of Engineers violated NEPA during the permitting process for the Permian Highway Pipeline.

“NEPA requires full consideration of the impacts of the action you’re undertaking, as well as looking at the alternatives,” Blackburn said.

According to him, if Kinder Morgan and the Corps had considered the environmental impact of the pipeline and possible alternatives, the planned route would be different.
» Read article        

» More about other pipelines       

GREENING THE ECONOMY

comprehensive climate plan
Did Congressional Lawmakers Create the Most Complete Climate Policy Plan Ever?
This week on The Energy Gang: how Democratic lawmakers would govern toward net-zero carbon emissions.
By Stephen Lacey, GreenTech Media
July 20, 2020

A group of House lawmakers recently released a 547-page report on climate change. Reporters at E&E News called it “arguably the most comprehensive climate policy plan in American politics.”

The report spells out in great detail how to use congressional policy to decarbonize the economy. It was the result of nearly a year of input from hundreds of experts, 17 hearings and thousands of meetings.

This week, we’ll discuss why this report is so significant. We’ll also look at a companion infrastructure bill from House Democrats that makes clean energy a centerpiece. Can it become a reality after the election?

Then, we’ll take a look at the drama surrounding pipelines and batteries. There has been a slew of legal decisions pertaining to pipelines in just the last two weeks, and we’ll consider what they mean for the future of fossil fuel infrastructure.
» Listen to podcast       

cash for coal clunkers
The World Needs a Cash-for-Coal-Clunkers Program
The drumbeat of coal bankruptcies makes it seem like the job is nearly done. Nothing could be further from the truth, the author writes.
Justin Guay, GreenTech Media – opinion
July 16, 2020

For just 5 percent of what the U.S. has spent on its COVID-19 recovery package, it could have bought out and retired every coal plant in the world.

Instead, the U.S. coal industry is benefiting from recovery programs while the world continues to subsidize old, uneconomic coal plants rather than retire them. As we debate a green recovery, now is the time to add an important approach to our tool kit, a cash-for-coal-clunkers program, to help buy the only thing we can’t make more of: time

In the U.S. and Europe, we’ve grown far too accustomed to the coal industry deathwatch. Nearly every day, articles appear announcing new record lows in coal generation, coal retirements and the generalized economic train wreck that is the coal industry. It’s enough to make the average person think the job is done, the transition beyond coal over. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The reality is that for the world to be on track to meet the Paris Agreement goals, every coal unit across the 37 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) must be offline by 2030; the same must happen in Asia and the rest of the world by 2040. The problem is, despite hitting global peak coal several years ago, we are not heading toward a steep decline; instead, we seem to be on a long, flat plateau.

Justin Guay is director for global climate strategy at the Sunrise Project.
» Read article        

» More about greening the economy

CLIMATE

way too hot
Scientists Revise Predicted Warming Range to Between 2.6 and 4.1 Degrees Celsius
Jordan Davidson, EcoWatch
July 23, 2020

Just how hot the earth will get if carbon dioxide doubles from pre-industrial times is a question scientists have wondered about for the past 40 years.

They have generally agreed that the planet will warm 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. Now, a major new study has narrowed that range, revealing we are already past any hope of a 1.5-degree increase. They have tightened their range to between 2.6 and 4.1 degrees Celsius, or 4.1 to 8.1 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Science Magazine.

The comprehensive international study released Wednesday and published in Reviews of Geophysics relies on three strands of evidence: trends indicated by contemporary warming, the latest understanding of the feedback effects that can slow or accelerate climate change, and lessons from ancient climates, as Science Magazine reported.
» Read article       
» Read the study

» More about climate        

CLEAN ENERGY

AG Healey planning ahead
Healey reluctantly rejects Brookline bylaw
Measure banned most oil, gas pipes in new buildings
By Bruce Mohl, CommonWealth Magazine
July 21, 2020

ATTORNEY GENERAL MAURA HEALEY’S office on Tuesday reluctantly shot down a bylaw approved by the town of Brookline that would have barred the installation of most fossil fuel infrastructure in any new buildings or significant rehabs of existing buildings.

In a 12-page ruling, Healey applauded the town’s bid to start addressing greenhouse gas emissions but said the bylaw approved overwhelmingly by town meeting members in November is preempted by the state building code, gas code, and a law giving the Department of Public Utilities oversight of the sale and distribution of natural gas in Massachusetts.

“If we were permitted to base our determination on policy considerations, we would approve the bylaw,” Healey said in her opinion. “Much of the work of this office reflects the Attorney General’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other dangerous pollution from fossil fuels, in the Commonwealth and beyond. The Brookline bylaw is clearly consistent with this policy goal.”

But Healey said she was forced to disapprove the bylaw because it conflicts with existing state laws and codes.
» Read article        

Florida green H2
NextEra Energy to Build Its First Green Hydrogen Plant in Florida
The largest U.S. renewables generator says it’s “really excited” about green hydrogen, revealing a $65 million pilot for Florida Power & Light.
Karl-Erik Stromsta, GreenTech Media
July 24, 2020

NextEra Energy is closing its last coal-fired power unit and investing in its first green hydrogen facility.

Through its Florida Power & Light utility, NextEra will propose a $65 million pilot in the Sunshine State that will use a 20-megawatt electrolyzer to produce 100 percent green hydrogen from solar power, the company revealed on Friday.

The project, which could be online by 2023 if it receives approval from state regulators, would represent the first step into green hydrogen for NextEra Energy, by far the largest developer and operator of wind, solar and battery plants in North America.
» Read article      

» More about clean energy

ENERGY STORAGE

super cool Manchester
Climate emission killer: construction begins on world’s biggest liquid air battery
By Damian Carrington, The Guardian
June 18, 2020

Construction is beginning on the world’s largest liquid air battery, which will store renewable electricity and reduce carbon emissions from fossil-fuel power plants.

The project near Manchester, UK, will use spare green energy to compress air into a liquid and store it. When demand is higher, the liquid air is released back into a gas, powering a turbine that puts the green energy back into the grid.

The new liquid air battery, being developed by Highview Power, is due to be operational in 2022 and will be able to power up to 200,000 homes for five hours, and store power for many weeks.

The Highview battery will store 250MWh of energy, almost double the amount stored by the biggest chemical battery, built by Tesla in South Australia. The new project is sited at the Trafford Energy Park, also home to the Carrington gas-powered energy plant and a closed coal power station.

Highview is developing other sites in the UK, continental Europe and the US, including in Vermont, but the Manchester project will be the first.
» Read article        

» More about energy storage               

MICROGRIDS

community microgrid
Massachusetts sees shared microgrids as way to boost resilience, cut emissions
A state grant program funded feasibility studies for 14 community microgrid projects to pool energy resources.
By Sarah Shemkus, Energy News Network
Photo By Protophobic / Wikimedia Commons
July 24, 2020

A state program has helped dozens of Massachusetts organizations explore the potential costs and benefits of pooling energy resources with their neighbors.

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center awarded grants to study the feasibility of 14 community microgrid projects. Unlike standard microgrids that tend to serve just one property owner, community microgrids incorporate multiple stakeholders and as a result are far more complicated to plan and build.

The goal is to power critical local facilities in a way that improves community resilience in case of disaster and promises substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Each project received up to $75,000 to investigate the logistics and cost of building a community microgrid. The grantees can also take advantage of technical advice from industry experts.

“Microgrids really provide a sneak preview of our future electric grid,” said Galen Nelson, chief program officer at the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. “We’re funding feasibility studies to figure out what role they’ll play and how to make them function well.”
» Read article       

» More about microgrids        

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

big zippy
15 states will follow California’s push to electrify trucks and buses
A big step forward in reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines
By Sean O’Kane, The Verge
July 14, 2020

Fifteen states and Washington, DC have announced that they will follow California’s lead in switching all heavy-duty trucks, vans, and buses over to running on electricity, in what could be one of the most significant efforts to reduce harmful diesel engine pollution in the United States. It could also be a big development in the fight for environmental justice because emissions from diesel-powered commercial vehicles disproportionately harm Black, Asian, and Latinx communities.

The states that signed the agreement along with Washington, DC are: California, Connecticut, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

California’s Air Resources Board (CARB) announced in late June that all commercial trucks and vans must be zero-emission by 2045, with milestones along the way. The state previously announced a rule in 2018 that says transit agencies must purchase all-electric buses starting in 2029.

The phalanx of states and the District of Columbia are agreeing to similar goals, making it so that “100 percent of all new medium- and heavy-duty vehicle sales be zero emission vehicles by 2050, with an interim target of 30 percent zero-emission vehicle sales in these categories of vehicles by 2030,” according to the New York Governor’s Office.
» Read article        

post-diesel tech
Preparing the maintenance workforce for electric trucks
The labor pool of experienced technicians has always been small, and now trucking firms must train or hire workers with an understanding of high voltage environments.
By Jen A. Miller, Utility Dive
July 20, 2020

A shortage of trained mechanics and technicians in the trucking world is nothing new. What’s about to throw a wrench — or battery — into the problem: electric trucks.

“The population of experienced technicians has always been small,” Rick Mihelic, director of future technologies studies at the North American Council for Freight Efficiency, told Transport Dive in an interview. “And now it’s much more complicated because it’s not just hiring a qualified diesel technician. You’re going to have to hire somebody who’s willing to also be an electric technician.”

From training existing mechanics to work on two kinds of engines, to tapping a new generation of technicians attracted to newer, cleaner, software-heavy vehicles, the trucking industry is working to create a workforce ready to fix electric trucks for when they start taking over the road.
» Read article        

» More about clean transportation              

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY

 

Table Rock
Great American Outdoors Act Passes House With Bipartisan Support
By Jordan Davidson, EcoWatch
July 23, 2020

On Wednesday, the House passed the Great American Outdoors Act, a sweeping and historic conservation and public lands bill that President Donald Trump has pledged to sign into law, as CNN reported.

As EcoWatch reported, the Senate approved the bill in June in a 73-25 vote. The bill, which is being hailed as one of the most important environmental bills to pass in decades, secures permanent funding for the Land Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). It passed the house in a 310-107 vote and now moves to Trump’s desk.

The Land Water Conservation Fund, which was established in the 1960s, is a little-known bill that produces substantial public benefit. It uses revenue from the oil and gas industry to finance national parks and federal historic sites. A major portion of the fund is also allocated to local and state parks and playgrounds, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB).

The LWCF has been chronically underfunded, but the Great American Outdoors Act will require mandatory funding of $900 million annually, without using a penny of taxpayer dollars, as CNN reported.
Blog editor’s note: It’s wonderful to fully fund the LWCF and support our national parks, but the funding source is highly problematic. Locking in reliance on the fossil fuel industry to fund popular programs hands its promoters “greenwashing” talking points, while recruiting supporters among park-adjacent communities because of received benefits from a source they might otherwise oppose on environmental grounds.
» Read article        

Kinder Morgan posts financial loss as virus-related demand drop hits pipeline volumes
By Harry Weber, S&P Global
July 22, 2020

Kinder Morgan reported a loss in the second quarter versus a year-ago profit as demand destruction due to the coronavirus pandemic significantly reduced throughput on some of its pipelines.

The company expects the sharp declines in crude oil and natural gas production along with reduced demand for refined products to continue in the near term. Feedgas deliveries via its pipelines to liquefaction terminals were down compared with the first quarter amid cancellations of cargoes scheduled to be loaded at the facilities.

Kinder Morgan has cut its expansion capital budget for this year by $660 million, slightly less than the $700 million reduction that it previously estimated. Major projects are continuing and remain on schedule, including Permian Highway Pipeline, the company said.
Blog editor’s note: Describing the Permian Highway Pipeline as “on schedule”, may be what is known in Texas as a “tall tale”.
» Read article       
» Read about Permian Highway Pipeline troubles

race card
Fossil Fuel Advocates’ New Tactic: Calling Opposition to Arctic Drilling ‘Racist’
Some say oil and gas exploration is essential as a source of jobs and revenue for Alaska Native communities, but activists argue it is simply exploitation.
By Ilana Cohen, InsideClimate News
July 21, 2020

When Alaska’s all-white Congressional delegation branded opposition to oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Wildlife National Refuge as a form of discrimination last month, they may have hoped to play into a national dialogue about systemic racism—not necessarily to spark it.

In a letter to the Federal Reserve on June 16, Senators Dan Sullivan and Lisa Murkowsi and Rep. Don Young, all Alaska Republicans, called on federal regulators to investigate whether the refusal of several banks to fund Arctic oil and gas projects discriminated against Alaska Natives, depriving them of social and economic benefits. The politicians had previously called the banks’ refusal a discriminatory tactic “against America’s energy sector.”

But controversy followed quickly. In the weeks following the letter, Native organizers penned op-eds and climate activists posted on social media, blasting the three members of Congress for what they viewed as a hypocritical and misleading narrative.

Oil and gas advocates have for years maintained that opposition to fossil fuel companies equals “green racism,” and have portrayed the industry as providing economic aid to marginalized communities by supporting economic development, sponsoring local programs and promising reliable and affordable electricity.

Some in Indigenous communities also argue in favor of fossil fuel development, given the opportunities it promises. But in Alaska and elsewhere, Indigenous activists concerned about the future of their communities and the planet are opposing drilling and spearheading a movement to end investment in fossil fuels.
» Read article        

» More about fossil fuels

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