Tag Archives: Kentucky

Weekly News Check-In 8/16/19

WNCI-4

Welcome back.

Here’s a distillation of the most interesting and useful news we uncovered this week – from local to global.

We’re still following developments at the proposed LNG plant in Charlton, and also looking at the recent pipeline explosion in Kentucky. Columbia Gas reports that it is nearing completion of repairs following its own disaster last September in the Merrimack Valley.

We have news about the Northern Access Pipeline fight in Pennsylvania, and there have now been arrests of protesters at Wendall State Forest.

Lots to cover on climate. Clean energy alternatives received a nasty setback from the federal government, as the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management imposed a last-minute requirement that the developers of Vineyard Wind produce a cumulative environmental impact assessment covering anticipated future development of offshore wind along the US Atlantic coast.

News about plastics gets more alarming all the time, with industry developments moving exactly opposite the needs of a healthy environment. We found an interesting article about efforts in Australia to innovate on recycling – but the first need is to REDUCE production/consumption.

In fossil fuel industry news, a Cornel study ties the recent atmospheric methane spike to fracking industry growth since 2008, and it’s getting very difficult to insure coal plants.

Finally, electric utilities are exploring ways to balance demand and fluctuating power from renewable sources.

— The NFGiM Team

 

PROPOSED LNG PLANT – CHARLTON

 

Charlton seeks more time to weigh in on LNG plant proposal
By Debbie LaPlaca, Worcester Telegram
August 12, 2019

The Charlton Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals and Board of Health have registered with the state as interveners. As such, they were required to hire legal representation and file their testimony by Aug. 5.

Seemingly unaware of what was required, they collectively missed the deadline.
» Read article 

 

State DPU issues stay on proposed $100M LNG plant in Charlton
By Brian Lee, WorcesterTelegram & Gazette Staff
August 7, 2019

Tuesday’s deadline to file for intervenor status in the proposed $100 million liquid natural gas facility on Route 169, near a power plant, has been delayed indefinitely because of concerns raised by some Charlton officials.

In an interview, Planning Board Chairwoman Patricia Rydlak said that this week’s revelation that NEC officials do not have a deal in place with Millennium Power to buy backup fuel and use Millennium’s land was a surprise to many. Her board, along with the Board of Health and Zoning Board of Appeals requested the delay out of desperation, she said.
» Read article

» More LNG articles

 

WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG

 

Pipeline explosion released 66 million cubic feet of natural gas. Feds order repairs.
By Karla Ward, Kentucky.com
August 09, 2019

The natural gas pipeline explosion that killed one person and sent six others to the hospital in Lincoln County earlier this month released about 66 million cubic feet of natural gas, according to the federal government.

A corrective action order issued by the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Thursday provides some new details about the explosion and explains what Enbridge, the company that owns the pipeline, must do “to protect the public, property, and the environment from potential hazards” associated with the pipeline failure in the coming months.

A 30-foot long section of the pipeline was blown out of the ground, landing about 460 feet away when the pipeline failed about six miles south of Danville at 1:24 a.m. Aug. 1.
» Read article

» More pipeline hazards articles

 

COLUMBIA GAS DISASTER

 

Columbia Gas president says second phase of repairs ‘substantially’ completed
By Breanna Edelstein, The Eagle Tribune
August 15, 2019

Kempic made clear while addressing the media that “while we’ve done a lot of work, we have a lot to do,” he said. “We’re here for the long-term.”

The Lawrence Customer Care Center for in-person support will remain open until September 2020. A customer care line, which is used to call in issues related to appliances installed or repaired through Columbia Gas, will be up and running until May 2020.

The company is providing free insulation to homes in the three communities impacted through the end of 2019, to help curb heating bills.
» Read article

» More Merrimack Valley disaster articles

 

OTHER PIPELINES

 

DEC rejects National Fuel’s Northern Access Pipeline — again
By Thomas J. Prohaska, Buffalo News
August 10, 2019

The 24-inch-wide pipeline would carry fracked natural gas from Pennsylvania to a connection with a Canadian pipeline beneath the Niagara River. The new pipeline would be laid within a 75-foot-wide right of way. Some property owners have resisted granting easements for the work, however.

In 2017, the DEC refused to issue the water quality certificate, but the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said the refusal was invalid because the DEC missed a deadline to issue it, and in February, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals said the DEC should “more clearly articulate its basis for the denial.”

Thursday, the DEC did so in a 20-page letter to the company, asserting the project would damage too many streams, especially by churning up too much sediment to enable them to meet state water quality standards, and harm too much fish habitat.

“If allowed to proceed, the project would materially interfere with or jeopardize the biological integrity and best usages of affected water bodies and wetlands,” the DEC’s letter said.

However, federal regulators have denied that the DEC has the right to make any rulings about Northern Access.
» Read article

» More pipeline articles

 

ACTIONS AND PROTESTS

 

Protesters arrested while trying to stop loggers from cutting trees in Wendell
By Hector Molina, WWLP
August 14, 2019

Environmental activists filed a lawsuit on Wednesday to stop commercial logging on state land at the Wendell State Forest.

Three members of the Wendell State Forest Alliance were arrested early Wednesday for blocking the entrance to the forest, a peaceful act of civil disobedience.

Six protesters in another group spent nearly four hours deeper in the forest trying to stop the logging and delay the cutting of the trees by standing in the way of DCR crews.

The alliance filed a lawsuit against the Department of Conservation and Recreation for allegedly violating several state laws and regulations. The lawsuit asks for a temporary restraining order to stop the logging until they have a chance to prove their claims at a court hearing in Greenfield next Wednesday, August 21.
» Read article

 

As protesters, loggers clash at Wendell State Forest, Department of Conservation and Recreation officials ‘refuse to meet or speak,’ to protesters
By Douglas Hook, MassLive
Aug 14, 2019

The Department of Conservation and Recreation has not responded to requests from Wendell State Forest protesters to air their concerns.

“[The DCR] need to inform the public more about what we’re doing here,” said John H. Conkey and Sons Logging, Inc. co-founder Ken Conkey.

The group “oppose the destruction of this more than 100-year-old, intact oak forest for the primary purpose of commercial logging.”

According to Neswald, the WFA will show in court that DCR “has engaged in a pattern and practice of violating, ignoring and/or misinterpreting laws and regulations meant to protect the environment.”

WFA member Priscilla Lynch, who was also arrested on Aug. 9 at the forest, said that the DCR has “refused to meet or even speak,” to the WFA.

Ken Conkey also eluded to the fact that there is a lack of information on what his company are actually trying to do.
» Read article

 

Forest protesters file suit against Dept. of Conservation and Recreation
By David McLellan, Greenfield Recorder
August 14, 2019

Over the last year, members of the Wendell State Forest Alliance have been protesting the state Department of Conservation and Recreation’s (DCR’s) selective harvesting of an 80-acre old oak stand, a project that started last week, citing concerns about climate change and native species. The state is going ahead with the project, and department officials state the project is best for long-term forest health.

The local group has held signs along Route 2, picketed at a forest ranger station, garnered more than 1,500 signatures on an anti-logging petition and has physically tried to stop the project, with State Police making six arrests involving protesters in the last two weeks for trespassing and disorderly conduct.

Now, a lawsuit has been filed in Franklin County Superior Court by 29 of the group members, alleging the project is illegal and violates the Forest Cutting Practices Act, Global Warming Solutions Act, Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act and Administrative Procedures Act.
» Read article

 

Four Wendell State Forest protesters arrested
By ZACK DeLUCA, Greenfield Recorder
August 12, 2019

Multiple protesters were arrested Monday as the state logging project in Wendell State Forest continues.

The Wendell State Forest Alliance, a group protesting the state Department of Conservation and Recreation’s logging project, has been on site at the forest since Aug. 5. The group objects to the harvesting of an 80-acre, 110-year-old oak stand, citing studies indicating that forest preservation is crucial to combating climate change.

Massachusetts State Trooper James DeAngelis confirmed Monday afternoon that four protesters were arrested earlier in the day.

James Thornley, 72, and Morgan Mead, 56, both of Wendell, were arrested at 8:45 a.m. Two more protesters, Miriam Curland, 64, of Goshen, and Priscilla Lynch, 67, of Conway, were arrested at 1:18 p.m.
» Read article

» More actions & protests articles

 

CLIMATE

 

Don’t Burn Trees to Fight Climate Change—Let Them Grow
By Bill McKibben, The New Yorker
August 15, 2019

It may surprise you to learn that, at the moment, the main way in which the world employs trees to fight climate change is by cutting them down and burning them. Across much of Europe, countries and utilities are meeting their carbon-reduction targets by importing wood pellets from the southeastern United States and burning them in place of coal: giant ships keep up a steady flow of wood across the Atlantic. “Biomass makes up fifty per cent of the renewables mix in the E.U.,” Rita Frost, a campaigner for the Dogwood Alliance, a nonprofit organization based in Asheville, North Carolina, told me. And the practice could be on the rise in the United States, where new renewable-energy targets proposed by some Democrats and Republicans in Congress, as well as by the E.P.A., treat “biomass”—fuels derived from plants—as “carbon-neutral,” much to the pleasure of the forestry industry.

William R. Moomaw, a climate and policy scientist who has published some of the most recent papers on the carbon cycle of forests, told me about the impact of biomass, saying, “back in those days, I thought it could be considered carbon neutral. But I hadn’t done the math. I hadn’t done the physics.” Once scientists did that work, they fairly quickly figured out the problem. Burning wood to generate electricity expels a big puff of carbon into the atmosphere now. Eventually, if the forest regrows, that carbon will be sucked back up. But eventually will be too long—as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change made clear last fall, we’re going to break the back of the climate system in the next few decades.
» Read article

 

States Sue Trump Administration Over Rollback of Obama-Era Climate Rule
By Lisa Friedman, New York Times
August 13, 2019

A coalition of 29 states and cities on Tuesday sued to block the Trump administration from easing restrictions on coal-burning power plants, setting up a case that could determine how much leverage the federal government has to fight climate change in the future.

The lawsuit is the latest salvo in a long-running battle over the future of coal and how to regulate the nation’s heavily polluting power plants, which are major producers of greenhouse gases that warm the planet. It also is the most significant test to date of the Trump administration’s efforts to eliminate or weaken former President Obama’s regulations to reduce the United States’ contribution to global warming.
» Read article

 

The Oil Giants Might Finally Pay for Pulling the Biggest Hoax of All
New York State is alleging ExxonMobil knew the risks of climate change and defrauded its investors by misrepresenting them.
By Charles P. Pierce, Esquire
August 7, 2019

On October 23, in a federal court in New York, opening arguments will be heard in one of the most important corporate malfeasance cases of the modern era, rivaled only by the tobacco litigations of the 1990s. The state of New York is suing ExxonMobil on charges that the energy goliath consistently misled its investors about what it knew concerning the climate crisis—essentially lying to them about what it might eventually cost the company in eventual climate-related financial risks, because the company knew better than practically anyone else what those risks were.
» Read article

» More climate articles

 

CLEAN ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

Vineyard Wind delayVineyard Wind to Move Forward with Project Despite Federal Delays
By State House News Service, on WBSM
August 13, 2019

On Monday, Vineyard Wind — a joint venture of Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners and Avangrid Renewables — said its shareholders had “affirmed a commitment to deliver a proposed 800-megawatt (MW) wind farm off the coast of Massachusetts, albeit with a delayed project schedule.”

Project officials have been working with contractors and financiers to rework the timeline — and Gov. Charlie Baker has spoken with Vice President Mike Pence about the project — but a new schedule has not yet been determined.

“We were less than four months away from launching a new industry in the United States, so we thank the more than 50 US companies already awarded a contract or currently bidding on contracts, the financial institutions engaged in raising more than $2 billion in capital, and the first-class, global contractors that have joined us in planning for the first large-scale offshore wind farm in America,” Vineyard Wind CEO Lars Pedersen said in a press release.

“We remain committed to delivering that ambitious target.”
» Read article

 

Shareholders Affirm Commitment to Deliver Offshore Wind Farm but with Revised Schedule
Vineyard Wind press release
August 12, 2019

Vineyard Wind today announced that company shareholders have affirmed a commitment to deliver a proposed 800-megawatt (MW) wind farm off the coast of Massachusetts, albeit with a delayed project schedule. This decision follows the August 9th determination by the United States Department of the Interior (DOI) to significantly delay publication of the Vineyard Wind 1 project’s Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and to instead undertake a supplemental draft Environmental Impact Statement process. In public statements, the United States Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has indicated the supplemental process is needed to examine the effects from the many offshore wind projects that are expected to follow development of the Vineyard Wind project.
» Read article

 

Industry group knocks ‘regrettable’ move on Vineyard Wind
By Colin A. Young / State House News Service, in Taunton Gazette
August 12, 2019

As it kicked off what it hoped would be a week to celebrate “U.S. leadership in wind energy production,” a national wind energy industry group is instead making the case against the federal government’s new delay of the Vineyard Wind project.

The U.S. Department of the Interior and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management on Friday put a freeze on a crucial permit for Vineyard Wind — the $2.8 billion, 84-turbine wind project planned south of Martha’s Vineyard — so they can study the wider impacts of the growing offshore wind industry.

The American Wind Energy Association said the federal government’s “regrettable” choice “undermines the Trump Administration’s American energy dominance agenda and a major U.S. economic growth opportunity.”
» Read article

 

Vineyard Wind shareholders commit to Mass. offshore wind project despite federal delays
By Iulia Gheorghiu, Utility Dive
August 12 2019

Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt has ordered additional study for the Vineyard Wind offshore wind project, to the “surprise and disappointment” of the developer.

Vineyard Wind announced on Monday that shareholders affirmed their support for the first large-scale U.S. offshore wind project, despite the delay of the project’s Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS).

Shareholders will revise the project based on a public statement issued on Friday by the Secretary of the Interior, as the original timeline will not be feasible.
» Read article     

 

Vineyard Wind Project Delayed
By The Maritime Executive
August 11, 2019

The Vineyard Wind project, Massachusetts’ first offshore wind project, has been delayed indefinitely after the federal government’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) delayed its environmental approval.

Local media report that the company’s plan to break ground by the end of 2019 would have made it eligible for a 12 percent tax credit from the state, timing that some believe is essential to Vineyard Wind’s competitive power pricing.

BOEM has not made public comment about the details of the delay or a new potential timeline.
» Read article  

 

Mayors of Salem, Holyoke call for carbon fee
70% of revenue would go back to homeowners, businesses
By Kimberley Driscoll and Alex Morse, Commonwealth Magazine
August 10, 2019

Salem and Holyoke are fully committed to reducing our cities’ greenhouse gas emissions, but we cannot solve climate change on our own.  We need bold, state leadership.

The Massachusetts Legislature needs to act, this session, to pass H2810, An Act to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Promote Green Infrastructure.  Sponsored by Rep. Jennifer Benson of Lunenburg, the bill establishes a fee on the carbon in fossil fuels and returns most of the revenues from that fee to Massachusetts households and businesses.  It invests the remainder in local renewable energy, energy efficiency, clean transportation, and resilience.

A carbon fee is a charge on gas, oil, and coal. The fee is based on the amount of carbon dioxide these fuels emit when burned.  As this fee slowly rises over time, dirty energy becomes more expensive, and customers are encouraged to reduce their use of fossil fuels and move to cleaner energy options.

Many people, understandably, are concerned that this approach will cause the prices of gas and heating fuels to rise. However, unlike most governmental fees that disappear forever into government coffers, 70 percent of the revenues from the carbon fee will be given back to Massachusetts residents and businesses in the form of rebates. Every household will get two rebate checks a year.  People who use less energy – including the vast majority of low- and moderate-income households – will get back more in rebates than they pay in any increased fuel costs.
» Read article

 

Federal Review Will Further Delay Vineyard Wind
By Colin A. Young, State House News Service on WBUR
August 09, 2019

Vineyard Wind, the $2.8 billion, 800-megawatt offshore wind project planned for the waters off Martha’s Vineyard, has been delayed and will not move forward on the timeline it has been anticipating due to a federal agency’s decision to undertake a broad study of the potential impacts of offshore wind projects planned up and down the coast.

The decision of the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to launch a “cumulative impacts analysis” and hold up the approval of a key permit for Vineyard Wind until that analysis is complete will likely upend the supply chain, financing and construction timeline for the project chosen by the Baker administration and state utility companies to fulfill part of a 2016 clean energy law.
» Read article    

 

Feds call for more study on Vineyard Wind
Delay could be fatal; developer said it needed approval by end of August
By Bruce Mohl, CommonWealth Magazine
August 9, 2019

In a decision that could derail Vineyard Wind, federal regulators on Friday put their review of the project on hold temporarily while they seek to better understand the cumulative impact of the many wind farm projects being proposed along the eastern seaboard.

A spokeswoman for the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management issued a statement saying the agency is expanding its draft environmental impact statement on the Vineyard Wind project to include a cumulative analysis of wind farm projects on the drawing board.

The new delay is likely to throw off Vineyard Wind’s aggressive construction timetable, which called for construction to begin by the end of this year and be completed in 2021.
» Read article

» More clean energy alternatives articles

 

PLASTICS, HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Plastic in rain
It’s raining plastic in the Rocky Mountains
A USGS study identified plastic in more than 90% of rainwater samples taken from across Colorado.
By Eleanor Imster in Earth | Human World
August 14, 2019

The growth in single-use consumer plastics has fueled a surge in plastic pollution across the globe. Other recent studies have turned up microplastics high in the remote Pyrenees Mountains, in the deepest part of the ocean, in Arctic sea ice, and in U.S. groundwater.

I think the most important result that we can share with the American public is that there’s more plastic out there than meets the eye. It’s in the rain, it’s in the snow. It’s a part of our environment now.
» Read article

 

Trump To Promote Turning Natural Gas Into Plastics During Monaca Visit
By Jill Colvin & Josh Boak, Associated Press
August 13, 2019

Trying to hold support in the manufacturing towns that helped him win the White House in 2016, President Donald Trump is showcasing growing efforts to capitalize on western Pennsylvania’s natural gas deposits by turning gas into plastics.

Trump will be in Monaca, about 40 minutes north of Pittsburgh, on Tuesday to tour Shell’s soon-to-be completed Pennsylvania Petrochemicals Complex. The facility, which critics claim will become the largest air polluter in western Pennsylvania, is being built in an area hungry for investment.

The focus is part of a continued push by the Trump administration to increase the economy’s dependence on fossil fuels in defiance of increasingly urgent warnings about climate change. And it’s an embrace of plastic at a time when the world is sounding alarms over its ubiquity and impact.
» Read article

 

A Giant Factory Rises to Make a Product Filling Up the World: Plastic
Royal Dutch Shell’s plant will produce more than a million tons of plastic, in the form of tiny pellets. Many in the Pittsburgh area see it as an economic engine, but others worry about long-term harm.
By Michael Corkery, New York Times
August 12, 2019

When completed, the facility will be fed by pipelines stretching hundreds of miles across Appalachia. It will have its own rail system with 3,300 freight cars. And it will produce more than a million tons each year of something that many people argue the world needs less of: plastic.

As concern grows about plastic debris in the oceans and recycling continues to falter in the United States, the production of new plastic is booming. The plant that Royal Dutch Shell is building about 25 miles northwest of Pittsburgh will create tiny pellets that can be turned into items like phone cases, auto parts and food packaging, all of which will be around long after they have served their purpose.
» Read article

 

An Ocean Plastics Field Trip for Corporate Executives
Recycling is broken. The oceans are trashed. As the plastics crisis spirals out of control, an unlikely collection of executives and environmentalists set sail for the North Atlantic Gyre in a desperate attempt to find common ground.
By Rowan Jacobsen, Outsideonline.com
August 8, 2019

The problem with plastic is that it never rots, never goes away. But contrary to popular misconception, Eriksen explains, it doesn’t form floating islands of trash. It disintegrates. “Sunlight makes it brittle, the waves crush it constantly, and the fish and turtles and seabirds just tear the stuff apart.” The pieces get smaller and smaller until they’re tinier than a grain of rice and qualify as microplastic. By Eriksen’s count, there are more than five trillion pieces of microplastic in the oceans—more than there are fish—and despite some well-publicized debacles like Ocean Cleanup’s dysfunctional 2,000-foot-long boom, which was supposed to sweep the seas free, no force on earth is going to get that plastic out. The best we can do is prevent more from going in.
» Read article

» More platics & environment articles

 

PLASTICS RECYCLING

 

Recycling Is in Crisis. Could These Innovations Be the Answer?
Now that China is turning away the world’s recyclable waste, Australia wants to ban export of the materials and increase domestic processing. Here are some techniques being pursued.
By Livia Albeck-Ripka, New York Times
August 12, 2019

Last week, leaders in Australia made bold moves toward eventually banning the export of any recyclable waste in a bid to increase onshore processing of the materials. The ultimate goal is to prevent the waste from ending up in the ocean, they said.

“It’s our waste, and it’s our responsibility,” Scott Morrison, Australia’s prime minister, told reporters at a news conference on Friday.

Policy experts say that reducing initial consumption of materials is essential. But Australia’s commitment also involves developing new approaches to recycling that, if scaled up, might one day change where your takeout containers and coffee cups end up.
» Read article

» More plastics recycling articles

 

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY NEWS

Fracking methane boom
Fracking causing rise in methane emissions, study finds

Researchers say boom in shale oil and gas major contributor to climate emergency
By Jillian Ambrose, the Guardian
August 14, 2019

The boom in the US shale gas and oil may have ignited a significant global spike in methane emissions blamed for accelerating the pace of the climate crisis, according to research.

Scientists at Cornell University have found the “chemical fingerprints” of the rising global methane levels point to shale oil and shale gas as the probable source.

Methane, levels of which have been increasing sharply since 2008, is a potent greenhouse gas that heats the atmosphere quicker than carbon dioxide.
» Read article

 

Coal becoming uninsurable
Adani Beware: Coal Is on the Road to Becoming Completely Uninsurable
By Guest John Quiggin, Professor at the School of Economics at The University of Queensland, DeSmog Blog
August 13, 2019

The announcement by Suncorp that it will no longer insure new thermal coal projects, along with a similar announcement by QBE Insurance a few months earlier, brings Australia into line with Europe where most major insurers have broken with coal.

U.S. firms have been a little slower to move, but Chubb announced a divestment policy in July, and Liberty has confirmed it will not insure Australia’s Adani project.

Other big firms such as America’s AIG are coming under increasing pressure.

Even more than divestment of coal shares by banks and managed funds, the withdrawal of insurance has the potential to make coal mining and coal-fired power generation businesses unsustainable.
» Read article

 

‘Coal is over’: the miners rooting for the Green New Deal
Appalachia’s main industry is dying and some workers are looking to a new economic promise after Trump’s proves empty
By Michael Sainato, The Guardian
August 12, 2019

The coal industry in Appalachia is dying – something that people there know better than anyone. Some in this region are pinning their hopes on alternative solutions, including rising Democratic star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal.

“Coal is over. Forget coal,” said Jimmy Simpkins, who worked as a coalminer in the area for 29 years. “It can never be back to what it was in our heyday. It can’t happen. That coal is not there to mine.”
» Read article

 

EPA moves to streamline permitting for power plant expansions, gas pipelines
By Iulia Gheorghiu, Utility Dive
August 12, 2019

Power plant developers gained new assurances that the Trump administration will streamline the process for implementing upgrades and modifications.

The NSR proposed rule seeks to guarantee developers will avoid triggering New Source Review (NSR) if one portion of their project increases emissions, as long as those emissions are offset by a larger decrease in other parts of the project.

While the Trump administration has issued guidance in this area, the formal rulemaking process would make it more difficult for future administrations to reverse the interpretation, which applies to all fossil fuel-burning plants and other large industrial facilities, Sawula said.
» Read article

» More fossil fuel industry articles

 

ELECTRIC UTILITIES

 

Renewables’ variability sends wary utilities from traditional DR to DER and load flexibility
New technologies can expand utilities’ once-limited options, allowing control of load with customer-sited resources to balance variable generation, but utilities say they need incentives.
By Herman K. Trabish, Utility Dive
August 14, 2019

Traditional Demand Response (DR) serves supply-demand imbalances, but today’s variable renewables and distributed energy resources (DER) make imbalances more common and new load flexibility allows utilities to adjust loads down instead of increasing generation.

Adjustable smart thermostats for air conditioning (A/C) and heating, grid integrated water heating, and managed electric vehicle (EV) charging will be gateways to a DR market that adds residential DER to traditional DR using commercial -industrial customers’ load, according to a new Brattle report. This more flexible load can protect against variability from rising levels of solar and wind generation.

And it’s that residential segment that will come to dominate the DR market in the next 10 years.
» Read article

» More electric utilities articles

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