Tag Archives: natural gas

Weekly News Check-In 2/14/20

WNCI-2

Welcome back.

BU professor Nathan Phillips made news this week by ending his hunger strike and successfully calling attention to climate and environmental justice issues associated with the Weymouth compressor station project. A little farther north, citizens of Exeter, NH will have a chance to express opposition to the Granite Bridge pipeline simply by voting at Town Meeting on March 10th. The petition, appearing on the ballot as Article 25, states in part, “the scope of the project vastly exceeds the current and future energy needs of New Hampshire. The likely changes in energy production could result in ratepayers paying for technology that will be obsolete before it’s operational.”

Kinder Morgan / Tennessee Gas Pipeline’s Connecticut expansion project includes a stretch near Sandisfield, MA that was contested by the Narragansett Indian Tribe because it threatened ceremonial stone groupings. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission granted permission for construction before the case could be heard, and 73 sites were destroyed.

News about other pipelines includes a story from Oregon, where a proposed project has split a community between people who welcome the desperately-needed jobs and those who maintain those benefits are short-term and outweighed by environmental costs.

Climate news is all about the stunning weather event reported last week, when record high temperatures were recorded on Antarctica’s Trinity Peninsula.

One piece of our clean energy future is about to be demonstrated through a pilot project in Boston, in 140 housing units built on a 10-acre tract of land and heated/cooled by a micro-district geothermal system. This will entirely eliminate the need for natural gas in those homes. An unrelated article describes the problem of retired wind turbine blades piling up in landfills – a reminder that there’s no truly benign way to meet human energy demand.

Can carbon offsets qualify air travel as acceptably clean transportation? In an attempt to stay ahead of the flight-shaming movement, jetBlue is hoping you think so. Meanwhile, the U.S. Justice Department dropped its anti-trust probe against a group of automakers that said they’d comply with California’s progressive emissions targets.

We found some riveting stories on the fossil fuel industry. With financial analysts warning of a global industry collapse, European regulators scrutinizing overall emissions in the natural gas production and delivery chain, and new legislation proposing a U.S. ban on fracking… somehow the natural gas industry thinks its main problem is public relations. Be sure to also read The fossil fuel industry’s invisible colonization of academia,  a three-year-old article from The Guardian that we include here because it’s relevant to other stories.

Finally, a look at Dart Container Corporation’s hardball play to save the ubiquitous foam coffee cup.

— The NFGiM Team

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

strike over
‘I Feel Victorious’: BU Professor Ends Hunger Strike Over Weymouth Compressor
By Miriam Wasser, WBUR
February 11, 2020

Boston University Professor Nathan Phillips will end the hunger strike he began two weeks ago over what he called “serious public health and safety violations” at the Weymouth natural gas compressor construction site.

“The demands that I had for my hunger strike — we have made some progress,” Phillips said at a press conference Tuesday afternoon in Boston. “Yet the reason for my action was to put the spotlight on [environmental justice] and on the officials that are accountable and responsible. I think, and I hope, we’ve reached a tipping point in public awareness.”
» Read article

crossing the line
Crossing the Line: A Scientist’s Road From Neutrality to Activism
Nathan Phillips, who just ended a 14-day hunger strike, said he was compelled to action by dissatisfaction with academia’s passivity and the fervor of his students.
By Phil McKenna, InsideClimate News
February 11, 2020

The hunger strike—which he ended at about 3 p.m. Wednesday afternoon—carried physical risks. Lanky to begin with, the 53-year-old Korean American professor has lost 22 pounds since he stopped eating on Jan. 29, and has been subsisting on unsweetened tea, sea salt and vitamin supplements.

The protest also carried professional risks. He has been challenged by colleagues and his increasing activism—Phillips has been arrested for non-violent protests against fossil fuel projects three times since October—may lead other scientists, including some potential research collaborators, to question his methods and objectivity.

Phillips says they are risks he has to take.

“There’s really no other recourse that me or others fighting this battle have because the state and federal regulatory and executive agencies have failed the community,” he said. “They have washed their hands of this.”
» Read article

Phillips hunger strike
Dr. Nathan Phillips—Hunger Strike
By Carolyn Shadid Lewis, Vimeo
February 10, 2020

Dr. Nathan Phillips speaks with Carolyn Shadid Lewis about his personal journey with the Weymouth Compressor and his decision to go on hunger strike.
» View report

» More about the Weymouth compressor station

GRANITE BRIDGE PIPELINE

Granite Bridge citizen petition
Exeter voters to weigh in on proposed Granite Bridge pipeline
By Alex LaCasse, Seacoast Online
February 6, 2020

EXETER — A citizen’s petition on the March 10 Town Meeting ballot calls for residents to oppose the Granite Bridge pipeline project, currently under review by the state’s Public Utilities Commission.

Granite Bridge is the proposed $414 million, 27-mile, 16-inch natural gas pipeline from Exeter to Manchester to be constructed by Liberty Utilities within the Route 101 right of way, designated by law as a state Energy Infrastructure Corridor. The project, which includes constructing a liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage tank in an abandoned quarry in Epping, is more than a year into the PUC review process.

The petition, appearing on the March ballot as Article 25, states in part, “the scope of the project vastly exceeds the current and future energy needs of New Hampshire. The likely changes in energy production could result in ratepayers paying for technology that will be obsolete before it’s operational.”
» Read article

» More about the Granite Bridge Pipeline

CT EXPANSION NEWS

Court rules against Narragansett Tribe in pipeline dispute
By Providence Journal
February 7, 2020

PROVIDENCE (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled against a Rhode Island tribe Friday in a dispute over a natural gas pipeline built in Massachusetts on land with ceremonial stone groupings.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit dismissed a petition by the Narragansett Indian Tribe’s historic preservation office for lack of jurisdiction.

The tribe argued that in authorizing the Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co. to build a pipeline across landscapes with sacred significance, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied it procedural protections of the National Historic Preservation Act. The tribe took issue with a nearly 4-mile-long pipeline segment near Sandisfield, Massachusetts.

The court found the tribe lacks standing to seek relief because the ceremonial landscapes had been destroyed by the time it filed its petition for review,.
» Read article

» More on the CT expansion project    

OTHER PIPELINES

Natural gas pipeline proposal fractures Oregon community
By Christopher Booker, Connie Kargbo, Sam Weber, PBS
February 9, 2020

A protracted battle in Oregon over a proposal to build a 229-mile natural gas pipeline and processing terminal in the southern part of the state is pitting those hungry for economic development against those wary of the project’s environmental risks. But as NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker reports, that fight is drawing closer to a conclusion.
» Listen to report or read transcript                  

» More about other pipelines    

CLIMATE

warmest January
Earth just had hottest January since records began, data shows
Average global temperature 2.5F above 20th-century average
Antarctic has begun February with several temperature spikes
By Oliver Milman, The Guardian
February 13, 2020

Last month was the hottest January on record over the world’s land and ocean surfaces, with average temperatures exceeding anything in the 141 years of data held by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The record temperatures in January follow an exceptionally warm 2019, which has been ranked as the second hottest year for the planet’s surface since reliable measurements started. The past five years and the past decade are the hottest in 150 years of record-keeping, an indication of the gathering pace of the climate crisis.
» Read article    

hot spot
Antarctica just hit 65 degrees, its warmest temperature ever recorded
By Matthew Cappucci, Washington Post
February 7, 2020

Just days after the Earth saw its warmest January on record, Antarctica has broken its warmest temperature ever recorded. A reading of 65 degrees was taken Thursday at Esperanza Base along Antarctica’s Trinity Peninsula, making it the ordinarily frigid continent’s highest measured temperature in history.

The Argentine research base is on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Randy Cerveny, who tracks extremes for the World Meteorological Organization, called Thursday’s reading a “likely record,” although the mark will still have to be officially reviewed and certified.

The balmy reading beats out the previous record of 63.5 degrees, which occurred March 24, 2015.
» Read article

» More about climate    

CLEAN ENERGY

district geothermal in Mattapan
Geothermal heating district could rise in Mattapan
City officials say they’re backing the project because it would further Boston’s ‘commitment to climate action’
By Jon Chesto, Boston Globe
February 11, 2020

The redevelopment of the old Boston State Hospital in Mattapan has added hundreds of modest-priced residences to the city during the past two decades.

But now the state has put the final 10-acre slice of this sprawling 175-acre campus up for grabs. And the Walsh administration has weighed in, singling out one of the bidders for its unusual component: a more environmentally friendly way to heat and cool our homes.

That bidder is Thomas F. Welch & Associates, whose proposal for the 140-unit Orchard Village project at first looks like other residential projects of its size — with one major exception: The entire assemblage of apartments and townhouses would be heated and cooled by geothermal energy, not natural gas. City officials say they’re backing the project because it would further Boston’s “commitment to climate action.” They see its potential to become a model for other micro-district heating systems, a success story that could be replicated elsewhere.
» Read article

Vineyard Wind delayed
Vineyard Wind Announces New Delay In Offshore Wind Project
By Colin A. Young, State House News Service, on WBUR
February 11, 2020

Vineyard Wind no longer expects its 800-megawatt project to become operational by 2022, the company said Tuesday after federal officials announced a new — and longer-than-anticipated — timeline for their review of the project and offshore wind sector generally.

“We have received updated information from the Department of Interior that indicates the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Vineyard Wind I project will be published later than what was previously anticipated,” Vineyard Wind CEO Lars Pedersen said in a statement.

“While we need to analyze what a longer permitting timeline will mean for beginning construction, commercial operation in 2022 is no longer expected. We look forward to the clarity that will come with a final EIS so that Vineyard Wind can deliver this project to Massachusetts and kick off the new US offshore energy industry.”
» Read article    

Saugerties solar
New solar array at old Saugerties landfill ready to start generating
By Christina Coulter, Hudson Valley One
February 7, 2020

Some 7,000 gleaming new solar panels uniformly line the site of the now-capped Town of Saugerties landfill and should be online in the next month, according to developers from East Light Solar.

The Town of Saugerties, the board of which approved the 2.8-megawatt project last March, will purchase 40 percent of the project’s total energy output, according to Town Supervisor Fred Costello Jr. Approximately 800,000 kilowatts of the town’s cut will power 80 percent of town facilities and the savings will ultimately extend to taxpayers, Costello said.

The remainder of the energy produced will be sold to an estimated 150 Saugerties homes and businesses. The impressive array was erected in just three months, with construction beginning in November.
» Read article

retired blades
Wind Turbine Blades Can’t Be Recycled, So They’re Piling Up in Landfills
Companies are searching for ways to deal with the tens of thousands of blades that have reached the end of their lives.
By Chris Martin, Bloomberg Green
February 5, 2020

A wind turbine’s blades can be longer than a Boeing 747 wing, so at the end of their lifespan they can’t just be hauled away. First, you need to saw through the lissome fiberglass using a diamond-encrusted industrial saw to create three pieces small enough to be strapped to a tractor-trailer.

The municipal landfill in Casper, Wyoming, is the final resting place of 870 blades whose days making renewable energy have come to end. The severed fragments look like bleached whale bones nestled against one another.

Tens of thousands of aging blades are coming down from steel towers around the world and most have nowhere to go but landfills. In the U.S. alone, about 8,000 will be removed in each of the next four years.
» Read article

» More about clean energy

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

Jet Blue offsets
Could the Flight Shaming Movement Take Off in the U.S.? JetBlue Thinks So.
The airline is the first American carrier planning to purchase “offsets” for carbon emissions from all domestic flights, a move some activists denounce as a stunt.
By Kristoffer Tigue, InsideClimate News
February 7, 2020

In January, JetBlue became the first major U.S. airline to announce plans to become carbon neutral as a way to assuage customer concerns over the impact of commercial flying on the climate. In a press release, the airline said it hopes by July to offset greenhouse gas emissions from all of its domestic flights by funding projects that help reduce emissions elsewhere.

The very notion of “green” flights strikes some climate activists as absurd. Peter Kalmus, a climate scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab and “low-carbon travel” activist, said there’s no more potent way hour-for-hour to warm the planet than flying. He considers offset schemes suspect, and he believes offsets might do more harm than good because they make people believe they can fly without contributing to climate change. Kalmus notes that he speaks only on his own behalf, not NASA’s.

But Peter Miller of the Natural Resources Defense Council told InsideClimate News that the offset market has made major strides toward becoming more standardized, transparent and effective.
» Read article

CARB limits OK
Justice Department Drops Antitrust Probe Against Automakers That Sided With California on Emissions
By Coral Davenport, New York Times
February 7, 2020

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department has dropped its antitrust inquiry into four automakers that had sided with California in its dispute with the Trump administration over reducing climate-warming vehicle pollution, deciding that the companies had violated no laws, according to people familiar with the matter.

The investigation, launched last September, had escalated a dispute over one of President Trump’s most significant rollbacks of global warming regulations. The Justice Department’s move was one of a slew of seemingly retributive actions by the White House against California, as the state worked with the four automakers — Ford Motor Company, Volkswagen of America, Honda and BMW — to defy Mr. Trump’s planned rollback of national fuel economy standards.
» Read article

» More about clean transportation

FOSSIL FUEL

Arctic Lady
EU Plans to Measure True Climate Impacts of LNG Imports From US Fracked Gas
By Justin Mikulka, DeSmog Blog
February 12, 2020

With growing evidence that the climate impacts of natural gas are comparable to coal, the European Commission is planning to study ways to reduce methane emissions across the life cycle of natural gas production and consumption, with potential implications for fracked gas producers in the U.S.

“Work has started on the methane emissions linked to the energy sector, including oil and gas production and transport, but also coal mines and we are planning on presenting the strategic plan still this year,” said an unnamed official working with European Union (EU) energy commissioner Kadri Simson, as reported by Euractiv.

The EU obtains natural gas from many sources, both in gas form via pipeline and as liquefied natural gas (LNG). One area of this EU study will be methane emissions over the life cycle of LNG imports from U.S. fracked natural gas.

Bloomberg recently analyzed the climate impact of U.S. LNG production facilities and reported that “an analysis shows the plants’ potential carbon dioxide emissions rival those of coal.”

Nevertheless, the oil and gas industry is putting serious ad dollars into positioning natural gas as a climate solution. As renewables have become more cost-competitive, the industry has shifted its language away from selling natural gas as a bridge fuel to renewables and toward gas as a “foundation fuel.”
» Read article

oil sands divestment
Global Financial Giants Swear Off Funding an Especially Dirty Fuel
By Christopher Flavelle, New York Times
February 12, 2020

In April, voters elected a provincial leader who promised to punish companies that stopped financing the oil sands. Then, in December, Alberta opened what it called a war room to attack anyone perceived as criticizing the industry.

“We have been targeted by a foreign-funded campaign of special interests,” Alberta’s premier, Jason Kenney, said after winning office last year. “When multinational companies like HSBC boycott Alberta, we’ll boycott them.” HSBC, the largest bank in Europe, has said it will stop financing new oil sands developments.

Alberta officials didn’t immediately respond to questions about BlackRock’s announcement on Wednesday.

The brawl over billions of dollars in lending and investment, while centered on Alberta’s oil sands, shows the potential power of the financial industry to speed the shift to cleaner energy sources, even as the world’s government fail in their pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions. It also shows how quickly financial-industry pressure can instill a degree of political panic.

But financial institutions worldwide are coming under growing pressure from shareholders to pull money from high-emitting industries. At the same time they are waking up to the fact that they have underestimated the climate-change risk in their portfolios.
» Read article

gas PR
Report Attacks Industry Campaign to Fix Natural Gas’s Climate PR Problem
By Dana Drugmand, DeSmog Blog
February 9, 2020

A new report from advocacy group Food and Water Watch argues that fracking and continued reliance on natural gas is detrimental to addressing climate change. The report, which calls out the fossil fuel industry’s misleading narratives around natural gas, comes at a time when progressive members of Congress like Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are introducing a bill to ban fracking and when the industry is ramping up its public relations push around gas.

According to Food and Water Watch’s (FWW) report, greenhouse gas emissions reductions from the power sector over the past decade are not as great as the gas industry claims. FWW researchers found that combined emissions from coal and gas power plants declined 10.4 percent over the last decade. If emissions continue to decline at this roughly 10 percent pace, the report says, they will not reach zero until 2100.

The report examines data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), an academic emissions inventory, and a recent Cornell University study. FWW developed a model that evaluates life-cycle emissions of power production, including methane emissions from coal and natural gas production, processing, transportation, and end use. The organization’s analysis is also based on a comprehensive synthesis of methane leak research.
» Read article    
» Read report    

oil glut
Saudi-Russian Alliance Is Strained as Coronavirus Saps Demand for Oil
OPEC is still trying to forge an agreement on new output cuts to sop up an oil glut.
By Stanley Reed, New York Times
February 7, 2020

An alliance between Saudi Arabia and Russia has helped prop up oil prices for the last three years. But the two big oil producers were not in perfect harmony this week, as they have tried to recalibrate production targets to cope with reduced demand from China, whose economy has been crippled by the coronavirus epidemic.
» Read article

grand staircase escalante
Trump Opens National Monument Land to Energy Exploration
By Coral Davenport, New York Times
February 6, 2020

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Thursday finalized plans to allow mining and energy drilling on nearly a million acres of land in southern Utah that had once been protected as part of a major national monument.

The Interior Department’s release of a formal land-use blueprint for the approximately 861,974 acres of land will allow oil, gas and coal companies to complete the legal process for leasing mines and wells on land that had once been part of Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, established by President Bill Clinton.

To date, no oil, gas or coal companies have taken any of the legal first steps required to mine or drill on the land, although they could have done so at any time in the months following Mr. Trump’s proclamation that he was removing protection from the land, a spokeswoman for the Interior Department said.

“There has been almost no interest in mining and drilling on the lands excluded from Grand Staircase,” said Kimberly Finch, the spokeswoman.

Environmentalists decried the latest step in the Trump administration’s efforts to open public lands to energy exploration.
» Read article

tight oil
Government Agency Warns Global Oil Industry Is on the Brink of a Meltdown

We are not running out of oil, but it’s becoming uneconomical to exploit it—another reason we need to move to renewables as quickly as possible.
By Nafeez Ahmed, Vice
February 4, 2020

A government research report produced by Finland warns that the increasingly unsustainable economics of the oil industry could derail the global financial system within the next few years.

The new report is published by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), which operates under the government’s Ministry of Economic Affairs. GTK is currently the European Commission’s lead coordinator of the EU’s ProMine project, its flagship mineral resources database and modeling system.

The report says we are not running out of oil—vast reserves exist—but says that it is becoming uneconomical to exploit it. The plateauing of crude oil production was “a decisive turning point for the industrial ecosystem,” with demand shortfall being made up from liquid fuels which are far more expensive and difficult to extract—namely, unconventional oil sources like crude oil from deep offshore sources, oil sands, and especially shale oil (also known as “tight oil,” extracted by fracking).

These sources require far more elaborate and expensive methods of extraction, refining and processing than conventional crude mined onshore, which has driven up costs of production and operations.

Yet the shift to more expensive sources of oil to sustain the global economy, the report finds, is not only already undermining economic growth, but likely to become unsustainable on its own terms. In short, we have entered a new era of expensive energy that is likely to trigger a long-term economic contraction.
» Read article
» Read report

fracking ban bill
Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez bill would outlaw fracking by 2025
By Rachel Frazin, The Hill
February 3, 2020

A bill introduced last week by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) helped craft would ban fracking nationwide by 2025, according to its newly unveiled text.

The legislation would immediately prevent federal agencies from issuing federal permits for expanded fracking, new fracking, new pipelines, new natural gas or oil export terminals and other gas and oil infrastructure.

A House version of the legislation is being spearheaded by Reps. Ocasio-Cortez and Darren Soto (D-Fla.).

By Feb. 1, 2021, permits would be revoked for wells where fracking takes place and that are within 2,500 feet of a home, school or other “inhabited structure.” The wells would be required to stop operations.

Fracking for oil and natural gas would become illegal “on all onshore and offshore land in the United States” by Jan. 1, 2025.
» Read article

the sponsors
The fossil fuel industry’s invisible colonization of academia
Corporate capture of academic research by the fossil fuel industry is an elephant in the room and a threat to tackling climate change.
By Benjamin Franta and Geoffrey Supran, The Guardian
March 13, 2017

The very experts we assume to be objective, and the very centers of research we assume to be independent, are connected with the very industry the public believes they are objectively studying. Moreover, these connections are often kept hidden.

To say that these experts and research centers have conflicts of interest is an understatement: many of them exist as they do only because of the fossil fuel industry. They are industry projects with the appearance of neutrality and credibility given by academia.

After years conducting energy-related research at Harvard and MIT, we have come to discover firsthand that this pattern is systemic. Funding from Shell, Chevron, BP, and other oil and gas companies dominates Harvard’s energy and climate policy research, and Harvard research directors consult for the industry. These are the experts tasked with formulating policies for countering climate change, policies that threaten the profits – indeed the existence – of the fossil fuel industry.

Fossil fuel interests – oil, gas, and coal companies, fossil-fueled utilities, and fossil fuel investors – have colonized nearly every nook and cranny of energy and climate policy research in American universities, and much of energy science too. And they have done so quietly, without the general public’s knowledge.
» Blog editor’s note: this article was referenced in “Crossing the Line”, the InsideClimate News article we carried about BU Professor Nathan Phillips, who has been actively opposing the Weymouth compressor station.
» Read article

» More about the fossil fuel industry     

PLASTICS, HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT

 

foam cups strike back
Your Foam Coffee Cup Is Fighting for Its Life
The Dart Container Corporation, which makes foam products, is a manufacturing behemoth and produced a fortune for the family behind it. Environmentalists say its products are polluting the globe.
By Michael Corkery, New York Times
February 10, 2020

Shortly after Maryland voted to ban foam, Dart shut down its two warehouses in the state, displacing 90 workers and sending a signal to other locales considering similar laws. San Diego recently decided to suspend enforcement of its polystyrene ban in the face of a lawsuit by Dart and a restaurant trade group, which argued the city should have conducted a detailed environmental impact study before enacting the law. The city is now performing that analysis.

“We don’t believe there are good, objective reasons to single out certain materials,” Dart’s chief executive officer, Jim Lammers, said in a recent interview at the company’s headquarters.
» Read article

» More about plastics and the environment  

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Weekly News Check-In 11/8/19

WNCI-6

Welcome back.

We’re leading again this week with the Weymouth compressor station. Both National Grid and Eversource this week stated they can meet their capacity needs without the compressor. Enbridge and the Baker administration are nonetheless pushing to move forward. Frustrated? If you agree this compressor station represents a danger to the Weymouth community and an obstacle to meeting Massachusetts’ own emissions goals, please call Governor Baker’s office at (617) 725-4005, and ask when the Office of Coastal Zone Management plans to release the Climate Resiliency Review that Mr. Baker promised in 2017. More details about that here. Public pressure counts.

A new report on the climate crisis, endorsed by 11,000 scientists worldwide, lays out priorities and guideposts for huge necessary changes – and underscores the fact that action can no longer be delayed.

Good news on both the clean energy and clean transportation fronts. The US is expected to rapidly increase clean energy infrastructure in the near future, and researchers are beginning to explore viable solutions for the tricky problem of recycling lithium ion batteries from electric vehicles.

We thought it appropriate to offer analysis of the Saudi Aramco IPO alongside a New York Times book review of Blowout, Rachel Maddow’s new book on the fossil fuel industry.

Finally, a report details how a planned Rhode Island natural gas power plant was rejected because demand could be met by renewable energy. And Vermont is rethinking its reliance on biomass based on updated science.

— The NFGiM Team

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

Shifting Demand Fuels Weymouth Compressor Debate
By Barbara Moran and Miriam Wasser, WBUR
November 05, 2019

The energy company Enbridge has a plan, and it’s called the Atlantic Bridge Project. Approved by federal regulators in 2017, the $452 million project would pipe more natural gas north from New Jersey into New England and Canada. To make the project work, Enbridge says it needs to build a 7,700-horsepower compressor station in Weymouth to push gas up the pipeline to customers farther north.

But two of the customers that signed on to the Atlantic Bridge Project — New Brunswick-based New England NG Supply Limited (NENG) and Exelon Corporation — have backed away from their contracts with Enbridge and agreed to sell at least part of their capacity to National Grid.

And National Grid — along with Eversource and Norwich Public Utilities in Connecticut — says it does not need the proposed Weymouth compressor to meet customer demand for gas.

This shift in demand for contracts has left Enbridge with fewer northern customers for its Atlantic Bridge Project. And opponents of the project are questioning again why Enbridge is pushing forward with plans for the Weymouth compressor station.
» Read article

Weymouth Compressor Station’s Permit Is Delayed Again
By Miriam Wasser, WBUR
November 5, 2019

The long saga of the Weymouth natural gas compressor station — proposed by the Canadian energy giant Enbridge to get natural gas to Canada — continues.

A state permit, which would have been a major step toward starting construction has been delayed — again.

WBUR discovered last week that at least three utility companies planning to use Enbridge’s pipelines say they don’t even need the compressor to get gas to their customers.
» Read article

National Grid, Eversource Say They Can Meet Natural Gas Demand Without Weymouth Compressor
By Bruce Gellerman, Barbara Moran, Miriam Wasser, WBUR
November 1, 2019


Two utility companies involved with the proposed natural gas compressor station in Weymouth say they don’t need the facility to meet customer demand. Now, opponents of the compressor station are calling into question whether the project — which has been the subject of public protests and lawsuits — meets the “public convenience and necessity” requirement for federal approval.

In September, one of those contract holders, New Brunswick-based New England NG Supply Limited, announced that it is withdrawing from the project. Shortly after, National Grid applied to take over the contract, and in testimony before the state on Oct. 25, said it could deliver this gas to customers “without the installation of the Weymouth compressor station.”

“The implication is that they would be shipping the gas within their service territory in the greater Boston area as opposed to sending it up and out of the country,” said Kathryn Eiseman, president and CEO of the Pipe Line Awareness Network for the Northeast, Inc., an advocacy group based in Cummington, Massachusetts.

If the state decides in favor of the project, then the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) must make its own determination before construction can begin.

“FERC really looks at whether there is market demand for a project [and] if there are signed contracts for a project,” Eiseman said. “But if you dig down a little and you see that the signed contracts will now be using the gas within Massachusetts, then there just is no justification, as far as I can tell, for building this compressor station.”
» Read article

Natural gas protesters urge Governor Baker to take action
By Jodi Reed, WWLP Boston Channel 22 News
November 1, 2019

Climate activists took to the Statehouse Friday to send a message to Governor Baker.

A group of activists from the south shore are worried that gas pipelines leading to a compressor station in their area will explode.

The group called, Fore River Residents Against Compressor Station said they have been voicing their concerns to the Governor Baker for years now but still, nothing has been done.

They outlined their concerns at a rally outside Baker’s office Friday, where they delivered hundreds of petitions to administration officials.

They want Governor Baker to deny the state permits needed for the project to advance.
» Read article

» More about Weymouth compressor station

CLIMATE

climate crisis 11k scientists
Climate crisis: 11,000 scientists warn of ‘untold suffering’
Statement sets out ‘vital signs’ as indicators of magnitude of the climate emergency
By Damian Carrington, The Guardian
November 5, 2019

The world’s people face “untold suffering due to the climate crisis” unless there are major transformations to global society, according to a stark warning from more than 11,000 scientists.

“We declare clearly and unequivocally that planet Earth is facing a climate emergency,” it states. “To secure a sustainable future, we must change how we live. [This] entails major transformations in the ways our global society functions and interacts with natural ecosystems.”

There is no time to lose, the scientists say: “The climate crisis has arrived and is accelerating faster than most scientists expected. It is more severe than anticipated, threatening natural ecosystems and the fate of humanity.”

The statement is published in the journal BioScience on the 40th anniversary of the first world climate conference, which was held in Geneva in 1979. The statement was a collaboration of dozens of scientists and endorsed by further 11,000 from 153 nations. The scientists say the urgent changes needed include ending population growth, leaving fossil fuels in the ground, halting forest destruction and slashing meat eating.
» Read article

Most countries’ climate plans ‘totally inadequate’ – experts
US and Brazil unlikely to meet Paris agreement pledges – while Russia has not even made one
By Damian Carrington, The Guardian
November 5, 2019

The world is on a path to climate disaster, with three-quarters of the commitments made by countries under the Paris agreement “totally inadequate”, according to a comprehensive expert analysis.

Four nations produce half of all carbon emissions but the US has gone into reverse in tackling the climate emergency under Donald Trump while Russia has failed to make any commitment at all.

Other major oil-producing nations, including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Kuwait have set no targets to reduce emissions. China and India are cleaning up their energy systems but their surging economies mean emissions will continue to grow for a decade.
» Read article

flood of oil
Flood of Oil Is Coming, Complicating Efforts to Fight Global Warming
By Clifford Krauss, New York Times
November 3, 2019

HOUSTON — A surge of oil production is coming, whether the world needs it or not.

The flood of crude will arrive even as concerns about climate change are growing and worldwide oil demand is slowing. And it is not coming from the usual producers, but from Brazil, Canada, Norway and Guyana — countries that are either not known for oil or whose production has been lackluster in recent years.

This looming new supply may be a key reason Saudi Arabia’s giant oil producer, Aramco, pushed ahead on Sunday with plans for what could be the world’s largest initial stock offering ever.

Together, the four countries stand to add nearly a million barrels a day to the market in 2020 and nearly a million more in 2021, on top of the current world crude output of 80 million barrels a day. That boost in production, along with global efforts to lower emissions, will almost certainly push oil prices down.

Lower prices could prove damaging for Aramco and many other oil companies, reducing profits and limiting new exploration and drilling, while also reshaping the politics of the nations that rely on oil income.
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CLEAN ENERGY ALTERNATIVES

growth in renewables
New Estimates Predict a Lot More Renewable Power Growth in the U.S. Very Soon
By Justin Mikulka, DeSmog Blog
November 5, 2019

After revising its three-year U.S. power forecast, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has predicted major declines for fossil fuels and nuclear power alongside strong growth in renewables by 2022, according to a review of the data by the SUN DAY Campaign, a pro-renewables research and education nonprofit.

“FERC’s latest three-year projections continue to underscore the dramatic changes taking place in the nation’s electrical generating mix,” noted Ken Bossong, executive director of the SUN DAY Campaign. “Renewable energy sources are rapidly displacing uneconomic and environmentally dangerous fossil fuels and nuclear power — even faster than FERC had anticipated just a half-year ago.”

While the independent federal agency forecasts robust wind and solar development, it also predicts a large increase in natural gas capacity, which is consistent with the current public emphasis of the newly rebranded “natural gas and oil industry.” The projected gains in natural gas power, however, aren’t enough to offset the sizeable drops in coal and oil, resulting in an overall decrease in burning fossil fuels for power in the U.S.

At this point, the cost of wind and solar combined with battery storage is cheaper than coal power, much cheaper than new nuclear power, and in many places also competitive with natural gas. In some areas, electric utilities are already moving from coal to renewables and skipping over the so-called “bridge fuel” of natural gas. The argument for a natural gas “bridge” to affordable renewable energy has been crumbling, and the economics of future power generation don’t look good for this fossil fuel.
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First cyberattack on solar, wind assets revealed widespread grid weaknesses, analysts say
New details of a denial-of-service attack earlier this year show an energy sector with uneven security.
Robert Walton, Utility Dive
November 4, 2019

A March 5 cyberattack of U.S. wind and solar assets is back in the news, with fresh documents helping shed light not just on the extent, but also the simplicity of the first-of-its-kind intrusion. Cybersecurity experts say it reveals a utility sector not sufficiently vigilant, and failing to employ the most simple fixes.

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) in September revealed details about the denial-of-service (DoS) attack, urging utilities to keep firewalls patched and up to date, but held back the name of the impacted entity. E&E News last week revealed, based on documents obtained through a public records request, the victim was sPower.
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CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

EV battery design
The electric vehicle industry needs to figure out its battery problem
Without recycling, electric vehicle batteries could lead to mountains of waste
By Justine Calma, The Verge
November 6, 2019

Electrifying transportation is one of the biggest keys to solving the looming climate crisis. With more electric vehicles on the road and fewer gas-guzzlers, drivers burn less fossil fuels and put out fewer planet-heating gases into the atmosphere. But as electric vehicles become more popular, they’re posing another environmental challenge: what to do with their batteries once they’re off the road.

Those batteries are starting to pile up into a problem, according to a new paper published in the journal Nature today. We’ll inevitably need to recycle many of the batteries, but harvesting useful materials from used lithium-ion batteries from electric vehicles remains tedious and risky. Luckily, there’s still hope. The authors of the paper say that institutional changes — like designing batteries with recycling in mind and using robots to automate disassembly — could reshape battery recycling. In turn, those improvements could make electric vehicles even greener by using old batteries to supply materials needed to build new ones.
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FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY

Saudi Aramco IPO: the ultimate marriage between carbon and capitalism
A firm with the biggest carbon footprint seeks cash to grow just as the fight against climate change needs it to shrink
By Jonathan Watts, The Guardian
November 3, 2019

Roll up! Roll up! The world’s biggest climate polluter, Saudi Aramco is poised to announce the world’s biggest stock flotation in an ultimate marriage of carbon and capital. Any institution with tens of millions of dollars and few qualms about the environment is invited.

Entry is not as exclusive as it sounds. Individuals with a lot less cash and a lot more concern may also inadvertently find themselves as guests through pension funds that automatically track the stock markets.

Scientists warn that fossil fuels and money will soon need to divorce because carbon emissions must be slashed by half over the next decade if the world is to have any chance of keeping global heating to a relatively safe level of 1.5C. Despite this, Aramco expects to receive the greatest infusion of cash in history.
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Rachel Maddow Takes on the Oil Industry
Book review by Fareed Zakaria, New York TImes
October 30, 2019

BLOWOUT Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth By Rachel Maddow
“Blowout” is a rollickingly well-written book, filled with fascinating, exciting and alarming stories about the impact of the oil and gas industry on the world today. While she is clearly animated by a concern about climate change, Maddow mostly describes the political consequences of an industry that has empowered some of the strangest people in the United States and the most unsavory ones abroad. It is “essentially a big casino,” she writes, “that can produce both power and triumphant great gobs of cash, often with little regard for merit.”
» Read review

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POWER PLANTS

RI gas plant rejected
Renewables growth, market changes tanked Invenergy’s Rhode Island gas plant, regulators say
Robert Walton, Utility Dive
November 7, 2019

Invenergy’s efforts to persuade regulators that the ISO’s decision to end the capacity supply obligation was not indicative of declining need for the new plant were unsuccessful.

Experts “presented strong and credible evidence demonstrating that the need for this type of facility would likely decrease in the coming decade” the board said. And reports that were referenced during testimony on the plant “revealed plans forecasting a significant increase in renewables and a continued decrease in peak load.”

“The Board found those reports to be reliable and credible and strong indicators of the lack of need for the Clear River Energy Center.”

The Conservation Law Foundation (CLF), an opponent of the project, praised the written decision.

“As we said in June, this is a huge victory for Rhode Island and for the health of our communities,” CLF Senior Attorney Jerry Elmer said in a statement. “After years of lies and misinformation, Invenergy’s efforts to pave over a forest to build this dirty plant have been dealt a substantial loss.”
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BIOMASS

VT biomass on pause
In a Warming World, New Thinking Imperils Vermont’s Wood-Fueled Energy Market

By Kevin McCallum, Seven Days
October 9, 2019

Biomass is organic material used to create energy. In the Northeast that means one thing: wood.

That includes the cord wood that Vermonters have traditionally cut, seasoned and burned in woodstoves to heat their homes. It also encompasses wood pellets burned in efficient modern pellet stoves and boilers, both of which the state promotes with generous financial incentives.

Then there are the industrial-scale energy facilities such as the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station in Burlington, the largest producer of electricity in the state, and the Ryegate Power Station in Caledonia County. Both plants burn woodchips by the ton to generate electricity for the grid.

Proponents say biomass technology is crucial to helping Vermont reach its renewable energy goals. The state has committed to getting 90 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2050. Its energy plan calls for doubling the use of wood for heat by 2025.

Now those goals are bumping up against a growing body of scientific evidence that suggests planting new forests, better managing existing ones and designating more lands off-limits to logging can play major roles in moderating climate change.
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