Tag Archives: zero-emissions trucks

Weekly News Check-In 7/24/20

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Welcome back.

The Ashland Select Board has requested help from Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, as the town presses its opposition to the planned Eversource gas pipeline. Meanwhile, a Louisiana state appeals court ruled that the Bayou Bridge Pipeline Company “trampled” on landowner rights by starting construction without their permission. And we end the section with a recent report from Texas Public Radio on the many legal headwinds facing the Permian Highway Pipeline. This piece brought to you as an admittedly snarky counterpoint to a Kinder Morgan statement you’ll see a little farther down the page, where they claim the project is on schedule.

Greening the economy requires a plan, and Democratic lawmakers in the House Select Committee on Climate Change produced one that deserves serious consideration. We offer a good overview in podcast form, where it’s described as  effective, ambitious, and science-driven, rather than a program designed around politics. Kudos to Committee Chair Kathy Castor (D-FL) for producing a serious roadmap. Other news includes a proposal to buy out and shutter the world’s remaining coal plants – even the new ones.

Climate researches have removed some uncertainty about the extent of Earth warming related to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. A new report shows more clearly than ever what we risk by continuing with business as usual.

Massachusetts clean energy advocates suffered a setback this week, as Attorney General Maura Healey reluctantly shot down Brookline’s proposed ban on gas connections to new buildings – deferring to the building code as the ultimate authority. This illuminates the need to write gas hookup bans into the next energy efficiency stretch code – something proposed by Mass Climate Action Network’s EZ Code proposal.

Exciting news in energy storage involves long-duration “batteries” based on cooling air to its liquid state. Excess wind or solar power can drive this cooling. When electricity is needed but sun and wind aren’t cooperating, the liquid air can be expanded back to its gaseous state to spin a generating turbine. Manchester, UK will have this system soon – northern Vermont up next!

Massachusetts has completed feasibility studies of flexible community microgrids, and clean transportation is cruising along as fifteen states join California in a push to replace diesel trucks and buses.

The Great American Outdoors Act passed both chambers of Congress with broad bipartisan support and is on its way to the White House for signature. While the intent of the legislation is laudable – fully funding the Land Water Conservation Act which supports National Parks and other public lands – the money comes from the fossil fuel industry. While lawmakers congratulate themselves and news outlets gush about how wonderful it is that this involves no taxpayer money, we have to step back and wonder if there’s any real difference between locking in revenue dependence from the extraction and sale of fossil fuel, and locking in fuel dependence and emissions based on the build-out of pipelines and power plants. We can do better.

— The NFGiM Team

PIPELINES

Ashland calling AG Healey
Ashland Select Board requests AG’s aid in Eversource pipeline fight
By Cesareo Contreras, Metrowest Daily News
July 20, 2020

The Select Board has sent a letter to Attorney General Maura Healey requesting that she supports the town’s efforts in opposing Eversource Energy’s plan to replace a 3.7-mile gas transfer line that runs through town.

The letter, which was sent late last week and written by board Chair Yolanda Greaves, comes a month after Healey issued a petition calling on the Department of Public Utilities to investigate how its practices and policies affect the state’s clean energy goals.
» Read article        

BBP no trespassing
Court Rules Bayou Bridge Pipeline ‘Trampled’ Rights of Louisiana Landowners
By Dana Drugmand, DeSmog Blog
July 17, 2020

A Louisiana state appeals court has ruled that the Bayou Bridge Pipeline Company illegally “trampled” on the rights of landowners by starting pipeline construction without the landowners’ permission. The pipeline company must pay the landowners $10,000 each plus attorneys fees.

“This is a victory not only for us but for all landowners,” said Theda Larson Wright, one of the three Louisiana landowners who sued Bayou Bridge Pipeline Company (BBP) in September 2018. “All over the country, pipeline companies have destroyed people’s land, often without even attempting to get permission, and dared the landowners to speak up. Well, we did. I hope this victory will encourage many others to as well.”

The Bayou Bridge pipeline is a 163-mile pipeline through southern Louisiana carrying North Dakota crude oil to the Gulf Coast. It is the tail end of a pipeline network including the Dakota Access pipeline and is a joint venture of Energy Transfer and Phillips 66. The Bayou Bridge pipeline traverses ecologically sensitive areas such as the Atchafalaya Basin, the country’s largest river swamp, which contains old growth trees and many endangered species.
» Read article        

wrong pipeline wrong place
‘Wrong Pipeline In The Wrong Place’ — Nationwide Litigation Could Affect Permian Highway Pipeline
By Dominic Anthony Walsh, Texas Public Radio
July 6, 2020

The Keystone XL and the Dakota Access pipelines recently suffered major legal defeats — the construction permit for the Keystone XL was revoked in April, and the Dakota Access was ordered to stop pumping oil by early August. Kinder Morgan’s 430-mile Permian Highway Pipeline faces a maze of litigation, and the legal action against other pipelines around the U.S. could have ripple effects in Texas.

In the case of the Dakota Access Pipeline, a judge ruled the multi-billion dollar pipeline, partially owned by Texas-based company Energy Transfers, must complete a more thorough environmental impact study in accordance with the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA).

Jim Blackburn is an environmental lawyer and a professor at Rice University. He’s also the president of the Trinity Edwards Springs Protection Association (TESPA), which is suing Kinder Morgan for spilling 36,000 gallons of drilling fluid while constructing the Permian Highway Pipeline.

He believes Kinder Morgan — a multibillion dollar company — and the Army Corps of Engineers violated NEPA during the permitting process for the Permian Highway Pipeline.

“NEPA requires full consideration of the impacts of the action you’re undertaking, as well as looking at the alternatives,” Blackburn said.

According to him, if Kinder Morgan and the Corps had considered the environmental impact of the pipeline and possible alternatives, the planned route would be different.
» Read article        

» More about other pipelines       

GREENING THE ECONOMY

comprehensive climate plan
Did Congressional Lawmakers Create the Most Complete Climate Policy Plan Ever?
This week on The Energy Gang: how Democratic lawmakers would govern toward net-zero carbon emissions.
By Stephen Lacey, GreenTech Media
July 20, 2020

A group of House lawmakers recently released a 547-page report on climate change. Reporters at E&E News called it “arguably the most comprehensive climate policy plan in American politics.”

The report spells out in great detail how to use congressional policy to decarbonize the economy. It was the result of nearly a year of input from hundreds of experts, 17 hearings and thousands of meetings.

This week, we’ll discuss why this report is so significant. We’ll also look at a companion infrastructure bill from House Democrats that makes clean energy a centerpiece. Can it become a reality after the election?

Then, we’ll take a look at the drama surrounding pipelines and batteries. There has been a slew of legal decisions pertaining to pipelines in just the last two weeks, and we’ll consider what they mean for the future of fossil fuel infrastructure.
» Listen to podcast       

cash for coal clunkers
The World Needs a Cash-for-Coal-Clunkers Program
The drumbeat of coal bankruptcies makes it seem like the job is nearly done. Nothing could be further from the truth, the author writes.
Justin Guay, GreenTech Media – opinion
July 16, 2020

For just 5 percent of what the U.S. has spent on its COVID-19 recovery package, it could have bought out and retired every coal plant in the world.

Instead, the U.S. coal industry is benefiting from recovery programs while the world continues to subsidize old, uneconomic coal plants rather than retire them. As we debate a green recovery, now is the time to add an important approach to our tool kit, a cash-for-coal-clunkers program, to help buy the only thing we can’t make more of: time

In the U.S. and Europe, we’ve grown far too accustomed to the coal industry deathwatch. Nearly every day, articles appear announcing new record lows in coal generation, coal retirements and the generalized economic train wreck that is the coal industry. It’s enough to make the average person think the job is done, the transition beyond coal over. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The reality is that for the world to be on track to meet the Paris Agreement goals, every coal unit across the 37 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) must be offline by 2030; the same must happen in Asia and the rest of the world by 2040. The problem is, despite hitting global peak coal several years ago, we are not heading toward a steep decline; instead, we seem to be on a long, flat plateau.

Justin Guay is director for global climate strategy at the Sunrise Project.
» Read article        

» More about greening the economy

CLIMATE

way too hot
Scientists Revise Predicted Warming Range to Between 2.6 and 4.1 Degrees Celsius
Jordan Davidson, EcoWatch
July 23, 2020

Just how hot the earth will get if carbon dioxide doubles from pre-industrial times is a question scientists have wondered about for the past 40 years.

They have generally agreed that the planet will warm 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. Now, a major new study has narrowed that range, revealing we are already past any hope of a 1.5-degree increase. They have tightened their range to between 2.6 and 4.1 degrees Celsius, or 4.1 to 8.1 degrees Fahrenheit, according to Science Magazine.

The comprehensive international study released Wednesday and published in Reviews of Geophysics relies on three strands of evidence: trends indicated by contemporary warming, the latest understanding of the feedback effects that can slow or accelerate climate change, and lessons from ancient climates, as Science Magazine reported.
» Read article       
» Read the study

» More about climate        

CLEAN ENERGY

AG Healey planning ahead
Healey reluctantly rejects Brookline bylaw
Measure banned most oil, gas pipes in new buildings
By Bruce Mohl, CommonWealth Magazine
July 21, 2020

ATTORNEY GENERAL MAURA HEALEY’S office on Tuesday reluctantly shot down a bylaw approved by the town of Brookline that would have barred the installation of most fossil fuel infrastructure in any new buildings or significant rehabs of existing buildings.

In a 12-page ruling, Healey applauded the town’s bid to start addressing greenhouse gas emissions but said the bylaw approved overwhelmingly by town meeting members in November is preempted by the state building code, gas code, and a law giving the Department of Public Utilities oversight of the sale and distribution of natural gas in Massachusetts.

“If we were permitted to base our determination on policy considerations, we would approve the bylaw,” Healey said in her opinion. “Much of the work of this office reflects the Attorney General’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other dangerous pollution from fossil fuels, in the Commonwealth and beyond. The Brookline bylaw is clearly consistent with this policy goal.”

But Healey said she was forced to disapprove the bylaw because it conflicts with existing state laws and codes.
» Read article        

Florida green H2
NextEra Energy to Build Its First Green Hydrogen Plant in Florida
The largest U.S. renewables generator says it’s “really excited” about green hydrogen, revealing a $65 million pilot for Florida Power & Light.
Karl-Erik Stromsta, GreenTech Media
July 24, 2020

NextEra Energy is closing its last coal-fired power unit and investing in its first green hydrogen facility.

Through its Florida Power & Light utility, NextEra will propose a $65 million pilot in the Sunshine State that will use a 20-megawatt electrolyzer to produce 100 percent green hydrogen from solar power, the company revealed on Friday.

The project, which could be online by 2023 if it receives approval from state regulators, would represent the first step into green hydrogen for NextEra Energy, by far the largest developer and operator of wind, solar and battery plants in North America.
» Read article      

» More about clean energy

ENERGY STORAGE

super cool Manchester
Climate emission killer: construction begins on world’s biggest liquid air battery
By Damian Carrington, The Guardian
June 18, 2020

Construction is beginning on the world’s largest liquid air battery, which will store renewable electricity and reduce carbon emissions from fossil-fuel power plants.

The project near Manchester, UK, will use spare green energy to compress air into a liquid and store it. When demand is higher, the liquid air is released back into a gas, powering a turbine that puts the green energy back into the grid.

The new liquid air battery, being developed by Highview Power, is due to be operational in 2022 and will be able to power up to 200,000 homes for five hours, and store power for many weeks.

The Highview battery will store 250MWh of energy, almost double the amount stored by the biggest chemical battery, built by Tesla in South Australia. The new project is sited at the Trafford Energy Park, also home to the Carrington gas-powered energy plant and a closed coal power station.

Highview is developing other sites in the UK, continental Europe and the US, including in Vermont, but the Manchester project will be the first.
» Read article        

» More about energy storage               

MICROGRIDS

community microgrid
Massachusetts sees shared microgrids as way to boost resilience, cut emissions
A state grant program funded feasibility studies for 14 community microgrid projects to pool energy resources.
By Sarah Shemkus, Energy News Network
Photo By Protophobic / Wikimedia Commons
July 24, 2020

A state program has helped dozens of Massachusetts organizations explore the potential costs and benefits of pooling energy resources with their neighbors.

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center awarded grants to study the feasibility of 14 community microgrid projects. Unlike standard microgrids that tend to serve just one property owner, community microgrids incorporate multiple stakeholders and as a result are far more complicated to plan and build.

The goal is to power critical local facilities in a way that improves community resilience in case of disaster and promises substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Each project received up to $75,000 to investigate the logistics and cost of building a community microgrid. The grantees can also take advantage of technical advice from industry experts.

“Microgrids really provide a sneak preview of our future electric grid,” said Galen Nelson, chief program officer at the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. “We’re funding feasibility studies to figure out what role they’ll play and how to make them function well.”
» Read article       

» More about microgrids        

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

big zippy
15 states will follow California’s push to electrify trucks and buses
A big step forward in reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines
By Sean O’Kane, The Verge
July 14, 2020

Fifteen states and Washington, DC have announced that they will follow California’s lead in switching all heavy-duty trucks, vans, and buses over to running on electricity, in what could be one of the most significant efforts to reduce harmful diesel engine pollution in the United States. It could also be a big development in the fight for environmental justice because emissions from diesel-powered commercial vehicles disproportionately harm Black, Asian, and Latinx communities.

The states that signed the agreement along with Washington, DC are: California, Connecticut, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

California’s Air Resources Board (CARB) announced in late June that all commercial trucks and vans must be zero-emission by 2045, with milestones along the way. The state previously announced a rule in 2018 that says transit agencies must purchase all-electric buses starting in 2029.

The phalanx of states and the District of Columbia are agreeing to similar goals, making it so that “100 percent of all new medium- and heavy-duty vehicle sales be zero emission vehicles by 2050, with an interim target of 30 percent zero-emission vehicle sales in these categories of vehicles by 2030,” according to the New York Governor’s Office.
» Read article        

post-diesel tech
Preparing the maintenance workforce for electric trucks
The labor pool of experienced technicians has always been small, and now trucking firms must train or hire workers with an understanding of high voltage environments.
By Jen A. Miller, Utility Dive
July 20, 2020

A shortage of trained mechanics and technicians in the trucking world is nothing new. What’s about to throw a wrench — or battery — into the problem: electric trucks.

“The population of experienced technicians has always been small,” Rick Mihelic, director of future technologies studies at the North American Council for Freight Efficiency, told Transport Dive in an interview. “And now it’s much more complicated because it’s not just hiring a qualified diesel technician. You’re going to have to hire somebody who’s willing to also be an electric technician.”

From training existing mechanics to work on two kinds of engines, to tapping a new generation of technicians attracted to newer, cleaner, software-heavy vehicles, the trucking industry is working to create a workforce ready to fix electric trucks for when they start taking over the road.
» Read article        

» More about clean transportation              

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY

 

Table Rock
Great American Outdoors Act Passes House With Bipartisan Support
By Jordan Davidson, EcoWatch
July 23, 2020

On Wednesday, the House passed the Great American Outdoors Act, a sweeping and historic conservation and public lands bill that President Donald Trump has pledged to sign into law, as CNN reported.

As EcoWatch reported, the Senate approved the bill in June in a 73-25 vote. The bill, which is being hailed as one of the most important environmental bills to pass in decades, secures permanent funding for the Land Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). It passed the house in a 310-107 vote and now moves to Trump’s desk.

The Land Water Conservation Fund, which was established in the 1960s, is a little-known bill that produces substantial public benefit. It uses revenue from the oil and gas industry to finance national parks and federal historic sites. A major portion of the fund is also allocated to local and state parks and playgrounds, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB).

The LWCF has been chronically underfunded, but the Great American Outdoors Act will require mandatory funding of $900 million annually, without using a penny of taxpayer dollars, as CNN reported.
Blog editor’s note: It’s wonderful to fully fund the LWCF and support our national parks, but the funding source is highly problematic. Locking in reliance on the fossil fuel industry to fund popular programs hands its promoters “greenwashing” talking points, while recruiting supporters among park-adjacent communities because of received benefits from a source they might otherwise oppose on environmental grounds.
» Read article        

Kinder Morgan posts financial loss as virus-related demand drop hits pipeline volumes
By Harry Weber, S&P Global
July 22, 2020

Kinder Morgan reported a loss in the second quarter versus a year-ago profit as demand destruction due to the coronavirus pandemic significantly reduced throughput on some of its pipelines.

The company expects the sharp declines in crude oil and natural gas production along with reduced demand for refined products to continue in the near term. Feedgas deliveries via its pipelines to liquefaction terminals were down compared with the first quarter amid cancellations of cargoes scheduled to be loaded at the facilities.

Kinder Morgan has cut its expansion capital budget for this year by $660 million, slightly less than the $700 million reduction that it previously estimated. Major projects are continuing and remain on schedule, including Permian Highway Pipeline, the company said.
Blog editor’s note: Describing the Permian Highway Pipeline as “on schedule”, may be what is known in Texas as a “tall tale”.
» Read article       
» Read about Permian Highway Pipeline troubles

race card
Fossil Fuel Advocates’ New Tactic: Calling Opposition to Arctic Drilling ‘Racist’
Some say oil and gas exploration is essential as a source of jobs and revenue for Alaska Native communities, but activists argue it is simply exploitation.
By Ilana Cohen, InsideClimate News
July 21, 2020

When Alaska’s all-white Congressional delegation branded opposition to oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Wildlife National Refuge as a form of discrimination last month, they may have hoped to play into a national dialogue about systemic racism—not necessarily to spark it.

In a letter to the Federal Reserve on June 16, Senators Dan Sullivan and Lisa Murkowsi and Rep. Don Young, all Alaska Republicans, called on federal regulators to investigate whether the refusal of several banks to fund Arctic oil and gas projects discriminated against Alaska Natives, depriving them of social and economic benefits. The politicians had previously called the banks’ refusal a discriminatory tactic “against America’s energy sector.”

But controversy followed quickly. In the weeks following the letter, Native organizers penned op-eds and climate activists posted on social media, blasting the three members of Congress for what they viewed as a hypocritical and misleading narrative.

Oil and gas advocates have for years maintained that opposition to fossil fuel companies equals “green racism,” and have portrayed the industry as providing economic aid to marginalized communities by supporting economic development, sponsoring local programs and promising reliable and affordable electricity.

Some in Indigenous communities also argue in favor of fossil fuel development, given the opportunities it promises. But in Alaska and elsewhere, Indigenous activists concerned about the future of their communities and the planet are opposing drilling and spearheading a movement to end investment in fossil fuels.
» Read article        

» More about fossil fuels

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Weekly News Check-In 6/26/20

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Welcome back.

With construction continuing at the Weymouth compressor station even though Enbridge’s air quality permit was recently vacated, we found a good review of the situation that includes a look  at what to expect in the future.

Three months after pleading guilty, Columbia Gas was sentenced to pay a $53 million criminal fine for its role in causing the 2018 Merrimack Valley disaster that killed one person and injured many more.

In what may be the most absurd application yet of a recent wave of state laws criminalizing civil protests, two activists in Louisiana were charged with “terrorizing” a lobbyist promoting a new plastics plant. Their menacing weapon was a box containing a collection of plastic pellets found polluting a nearby beach. After turning themselves in for this harmless “crime”, the two women were led away in handcuffs and leg manacles.

A useful tool for greening the economy is to quantify the cash value of services provided by the environment and ecosystem – clean air and water, pollinated food crops, insect and rodent control, etc. We found an interesting article exploring that concept. Of course another critical piece of the “greening” puzzle is equitably caring for people and communities that are currently supported by unsustainable industries that must be eliminated in favor of green alternatives. We have an immediate and urgent test case, because the Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the timeline for coal’s demise.

The climate signaled a clear warning last week, with record-smashing temperatures exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit north of the Arctic circle. We’re suddenly seeing meteorological behavior that climate models didn’t anticipate until at least the end of the century. Meanwhile, a new study concludes that even “climate progressive” countries are falling far behind implementing steps to meet their targets under the Paris agreement. We’re much better at understanding the problem than at making known, necessary changes.

We take a sobering look at the cost of clean energy, focusing on U.S. demand for large-scale Canadian hydro power, and the resulting environmental devastation suffered by northern indigenous communities. To reduce demand for hydro, we’ll need alternative technologies – some of which are considered in this section.

Energy storage is facing a shortage of high-quality lithium for batteries as demand for them soars. Clean transportation requires a rapid upgrade of the existing maritime fleet to cleaner fuels and engines – rather that relying on attrition to replace older ships with new, green ones.

Legal troubles keep mounting for the fossil fuel industry. Pennsylvania’s Attorney General and a grand jury concluded that the state’s regulators allowed the fracking industry to harm its citizens. Minnesota filed suit against ExxonMobil, Koch Industries, and the American Petroleum Institute for lying to consumers about product safety. This is different from most other suits making their way through state courts, which seek compensation for damages related to climate change.

Finally, the woody biomass industry threatens the last of the temperate rainforest in British Columbia, and the newly-elected progressive Provincial government is weighing options to save it.

— The NFGiM Team

WEYMOUTH COMPRESSOR STATION

Senators weigh in again
Breathing Room for Weymouth: Compressor Station Air Permit Vacated by Federal Court
By Take Back The Grid, Blog Post
June 23, 2020

TakeBacktheGrid was thrilled to learn that on June 3, 2020, the First Circuit of the US Court of Appeals vacated the air quality permit for the fracked gas compressor station under construction in Weymouth, MA. The permit, originally granted by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), allowed the parent company Enbridge to begin construction. The vacatur of this air quality permit is a welcome victory following a long string of defeats and setbacks for the Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station (FRRACS) who have opposed the construction of this compressor station for over five years. The MA DEP has 75 days (beginning June 3rd) to re-evaluate the cost efficacy of various technologies considered in the air permit.

We decided to dig into the text of this vacatur to learn more about the judge’s decision and what the implications are for Weymouth and surrounding communities in the months ahead.
» Read article        

» More about the Weymouth compressor station

COLUMBIA GAS DISASTER

fifty-three big ones
Columbia Gas of Massachusetts ordered to pay $53M fine for explosions that killed The company has said it takes full responsibility for the disaster.
By Associated Press, in Boston.com
June 23, 2020

A utility company was ordered Tuesday to pay a $53 million criminal fine for causing a series of natural gas explosions in Massachusetts that killed one person and damaged dozens of homes.

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts was sentenced more than three months after the company pleaded guilty in federal court to causing the blasts that rocked three communities north of Boston in September 2018.

As part of the plea agreement, Columbia Gas of Massachusetts will pay a $53 million fine for violating the Pipeline Safety Act. It’s the largest criminal fine ever imposed under the pipeline safety law.

The judge also sentenced the company to a three-year probation period during which its operations will be monitored to ensure its complying with safety regulations, authorities said.

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts has said it takes full responsibility for the disaster.
» Read article        

» More about the Columbia Gas disaster

PROTESTS AND ACTIONS

nurdleterror
US climate activists charged with ‘terrorizing’ lobbyist over plastic pollution stunt
Anne Rolfes and Kate McIntosh face up to 15 years in prison after delivering box of plastic pellets found as pollution
By Emily Holden, The Guardian
June 25, 2020

Environmental activists opposing a plastics manufacturing facility in Louisiana have been booked with a felony for “terrorizing” an oil and gas lobbyist by delivering a box of plastic pellets found as pollution in bays on the Texas coast.

Anne Rolfes and Kate McIntosh, with the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, turned themselves into the Baton Rouge police department on Thursday, as first reported by the Times-Picayune.

The charges stem from a plastic pollution awareness event in December called “Nurdlefest”, which focused on the impacts of an expansive petrochemical and plastics complex approved to be built by Formosa Plastics in St James Parish.

Nurdles are the plastic pellets used to make plastic products. The Guardian has extensively covered the activism in its Cancer Town series from Reserve, Louisiana.

The offenses are punishable with up to 15 years in prison. The advocates’ lawyer, Pam Spees, with the Center for Constitutional Rights, said the charges have no merit and seem to be meant to discourage protesters.
» Read article        

honor treaty rights
Across the U.S., Anti-Protest Laws Target Movements for Climate and Racial Justice
By Karen Sokol, Drilled News
June 19, 2020

As people nationwide are courageously fighting for Black lives by exercising their First Amendment rights to protest, even in the face of widespread police violence, 28 anti-protest bills are pending in 18 state legislatures and in Congress. Thirteen states have already enacted such legislation, with a total of 23 anti-protest laws currently in force. Indeed, these laws’ clear targeting of the exercise of free speech is so alarming that the rapid pace of their enactments all over the country led the International Center for Nonprofit Law to create a “U.S. Protest Law Tracker.”

The legislation has come in two waves, the first starting in 2016 in response to protests inspired by a police officer’s shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed Black teenager, in Ferguson, Missouri and the creation of the Black Lives Matter Global Network.

The second wave of legislation began in 2017 and criminalizes protests near oil and gas pipelines and other fossil fuel industry infrastructure.The oil and gas industry began lobbying for such restrictions in response to the protests led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline….

These laws target protests of oil and gas pipelines and the polluting facilities they feed by declaring them “critical infrastructure” and making the unauthorized entry in or around them felony offenses subject to draconian penalties of imprisonment and fines. The oil and gas industry has been successful in its effort to silence protesters by criminalizing dissent essential to any just society: Since 2017, 11 states, including Louisiana and North Dakota, have enacted such legislation. Notably, three of those states enacted anti-protest “critical infrastructure” legislation under the cover of the COVID-19 pandemic. Louisiana’s governor just vetoed a bill that would have made the penalties stiffer still. Meanwhile, a bill is currently pending at the federal level.
» Read article        

» More about protests and actions

GREENING THE ECONOMY

gross ecosystem product
Nature’s accounts show what the world does for us
People go on getting richer, and the planet pays a mounting price. There’s a better way to balance nature’s accounts.
By Tim Radford, Climate News Network
June 24, 2020

LONDON, 24 June, 2020 – It may take a while to catch on, but one day the financial pages of the daily newspaper could be quoting a new register of national wealth: called gross ecosystem product, this way of balancing nature’s accounts makes clear how much we really depend on the Earth.

And it would be a real-world indicator of prosperity you could have confidence in: a measure in cash terms of the health of the forests, rivers, lakes and wildlife of both nations and regions and – more precisely – of the benefits heedless humans take for granted.

These include the insect pollination of crops; the control of insect pests by birds and bats; the supply of fresh, safe water from mountain streams, rivers, springs and lakes; the management of waste by scavengers and microbes; the recycling of nutrients; and all the myriad services provided by plants, animals and topography. This is sometimes called “natural capital.”

The measure has already formally been tested in one province in China and matched with the more familiar indicator: Gross Domestic Product, or GDP.
» Read article        

hard skills to transfer
Thousands of coal workers lost jobs. Where will they go?
As the long-shrinking coal industry hemorrhages jobs, states and local groups are seeking new ways to transition to a lower-carbon economy without leaving coal workers behind.
By Arianna Skibell, E&E News, in Energy News Network
Photo By Claudine Hellmuth / E&E News (illustration) / Cyndy Sims Parr / Wikipedia; ©b3d_ / Flickr
June 25, 2020

Dozens of coal workers stormed the Senate office building during the Maryland legislative session earlier this year to protest a plan that would phase out the state’s remaining six coal-fired power plants.

The bill in question included grant money for displaced workers and affected communities, but the local labor union dismissed the provision as inadequate.

“It was a non-starter,” said Jim Griffin, president of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1900. “Those bills were essentially written by the Sierra Club.”

David Smedick, a campaign representative with the Sierra Club who was active in supporting the measure, said Maryland’s transition away from coal should include support for affected workers, but he stressed the urgency of shutting the plants down.
» Read article        

» More about greening the economy

CLIMATE

simmering Siberia
‘This Scares Me,’ Says Bill McKibben as Arctic Hits 100.4°F—Hottest Temperature on Record
“100°F about 70 miles north of the Arctic Circle today in Siberia. That’s a first in all of recorded history. We are in a climate emergency.”
By Jake Johnson, Common Dreams
June 22, 2020

A small Siberian town north of the Arctic Circle reached 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit on Saturday, a figure that—if verified—would be the highest temperature reading in the region since record-keeping began in 1885.

“This scares me, I have to say,” environmentalist and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben tweeted in response to news of the record-breaking reading in Verkhoyansk, where the average high temperature in June is 68°F.

Washington Post climate reporter Andrew Freedman noted Sunday that if the reading is confirmed, it “would be the northernmost 100-degree reading ever observed, and the highest temperature on record in the Arctic, a region that is warming at more than twice the rate of the rest of the globe.”
» Read article            

factor of two‘Climate progressives’ fail on Paris carbon target
Even states seen as “climate progressives” are far from meeting their global commitments to avert dangerous climate change.
By Alex Kirby, Climate News Network
June 19, 2020

LONDON − Nations which pride themselves on their zeal in tackling climate change by cutting carbon dioxide emissions as they have promised, the so-called “climate progressives”, are a long way from living up to their promises, scientists say.

They say the annual rate that emissions are expected to be cut is less than half of that needed, and suggest the UK should reduce them by 10% each year, starting this year. It also needs to achieve a fully zero-carbon energy system by around 2035, they say, not 2050 as UK law requires.

The study was led by Kevin Anderson from the University of Manchester,  and is published in the journal Climate Policy.

Professor Anderson said the study showed how experts had underestimated the difficulty of tackling the climate crisis: “Academics have done an excellent job in understanding and communicating climate science, but the same cannot be said in relation to reducing emissions.

“Here we have collectively denied the necessary scale of mitigation, running scared of calling for fundamental changes to both our energy system and the lifestyles of high-energy users. Our paper brings this failure into sharp focus.”
» Read article
» Read the study

formerly cool and dark
Forests are a solution to global warming. They’re also vulnerable to it.
By Liz Kimbrough, Mongabay
June 25, 2020

Investing in forests to fight climate change seems like a sure bet. Trees absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, pump out oxygen, and live for decades. What could go wrong?

The answer, according to a newly published paper in Science, is: a lot. Fires, rising temperatures, disease, pests and humans all pose threats to forests, and as climate change escalates, so too do these threats. While forest-based solutions need to play an important role in addressing climate change, the risks to forests from climate change must also be considered.

“Current risks are not carefully considered and accounted for, much less these increased risks that forests are going to face in a warming climate,” William Anderegg, a biologist at the University of Utah and first author of the new paper, told Mongabay.
» Read article            
» Read the paper        

clear skies dataPandemic’s Cleaner Air Could Reshape What We Know About the Atmosphere
Coronavirus shutdowns have cut pollution, and that’s opened the door to a “giant, global environmental experiment” with potentially far-reaching consequences.
By Coral Davenport, New York Times
June 25, 2020

WASHINGTON — In the crystalline air of the pandemic economy, climate change researchers have been flying a small plane over Route I-95, from Boston to Washington, measuring carbon dioxide levels. Scientists have mounted air quality monitors on Salt Lake City’s light rail system to create intersection-by-intersection atmospheric profiles.

And government scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have started a Covid air quality study to gather and analyze samples of an atmosphere in which industrial soot, tailpipe emissions and greenhouse gases have plummeted to levels not seen in decades.

The data, from Manhattan to Milan to Mumbai, will inform scientists’ understanding of atmospheric chemistry, air pollution and public health for decades to come, while giving policymakers information to fine-tune air quality and climate change laws and regulations in hopes of maintaining at least some of the gains seen in the global shutdown as cars return to the roads and factories reopen.

Policy experts say the new data could even bolster legal fights against the Trump administration’s efforts to roll back major air pollution regulations. Early studies appear to show that even as the coronavirus took more than 100,000 American lives, deaths related to more typical respiratory illnesses like asthma and lung disease fell in the clean air, boosting the case that Mr. Trump’s environmental rollbacks will contribute to thousands of deaths.
» Read article            

» More about climate

CLEAN ENERGY

RigoletUS demand for clean energy destroying Canada’s environment, indigenous peoples say
Push is inadvertently causing long-term environmental damage to the traditional hunting grounds on Inuit public lands
By Matt Hongoltz-Hetling, The Guardian
June 22, 2020

Canada’s indigenous leaders say an unprecedented push for clean energy in the United States is inadvertently causing long-term environmental damage to the traditional hunting grounds on their public lands.

Rigolet lies downstream of Muskrat Falls, a $12.7bn dam on the Churchill River, a key drainage point for Labrador’s biggest watershed. Nalcor, the state-owned company that completed Muskrat Falls last year, is already planning Gull Island, another Churchill dam that would produce three times as much electricity, mostly for export to the US.

The Nunatsiavut government, which governs 2,700 Inuit in the area, says those dams will disrupt the hydrologic cycle underpinning the ecosystem, and increase exposure to a toxin associated with dam reservoirs.

When land is flooded, naturally occurring mercury is unlocked from the soil and vegetation and released into the water column, where it is taken up by bacteria and transformed into methylmercury, a neurotoxin that makes its way up the food chain and bioaccumulates in fish, waterbirds and seals.

Those species are critical to the sustainable lifestyle practiced by the Inuit.
» Read article        

prime impact
$50 Million Prime Impact Fund Launches to Invest in Early-Stage Cleantech
The fund screens startups for gigaton-level carbon-reduction potential.
By Julian Spector, GreenTech Media
June 22, 2020

A new fund is channeling philanthropic dollars into early-stage clean technology investments in the hopes of catalyzing major climate-change impacts.

The Prime Impact Fund closed a $50 million raise in recent weeks and has already made eight investments. The fund uses an unusual structure: It screens prospective investments for their carbon-reduction potential in order to direct investment to high-impact technology companies that might struggle to find funding through conventional means.

The investment team is professionally trained in hard sciences; it is looking to cut checks up to around $5 million for the sort of hard-technology startup that would scare the Patagonia vest off a typical Silicon Valley investor.
» Read article        

wasserstoffstrategieGerman hydrogen economy to spark traded market for imports: consultants
By Vera Eckert, Reuters
June 22, 2020

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Germany’s push to increase the use of hydrogen as a clean fuel to meet climate targets will require imports and a traded market to supplement home-produced supplies, a consultancy close to protagonists in the emerging industry said.

“There will have to be a mix of domestic and foreign hydrogen volumes, depending on where the cheaper source is,” said Andreas Schwenzer, principal consultant at Horvath & Partners, which advises the gas network Open Grid Europe.

“The energy market is already discussing how a euro-denominated wholesale market can emerge,” he said in an interview.

Germany this month agreed a national hydrogen strategy, which in July will be embedded in a wider European Union plan for a fossil-free future for the bloc’s industries.

Germany, one of Europe’s biggest gas markets, consumes 55 terawatt hours annually of CO2-intensive hydrogen from natural gas.

But it lacks land and offshore resources to produce sufficient carbon-free hydrogen from renewable energy to meet the EU goal to reduce net emissions to zero by 2050.
» Read article        

» More about clean energy

ENERGY STORAGE

looming lithium shortage
Battery makers face looming shortages of high-quality lithium

By Guy Burdick, Utility Dive
June 25, 2020

Battery makers are facing a shortage of lithium, and ongoing financial problems in markets suppressed by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to industry insiders at an Atlantic Council panel on Wednesday.

Despite material shortages, lithium-ion markets are taking off and supply problems will not result from a shortage of lithium raw materials, panelists said.

“What matters is the production of a high-purity, high-quality chemical that can be used in battery manufacturing,” Kumar said. “The number of companies that can produce a large volume of these high-purity chemicals is very small and they are constantly capital-constrained.”
» Read article        

» More about energy storage         

CLEAN TRANSPORTATION

Puffy McPuff Face
Clean ships needed now to cut polluting emissions

The vessels plying the world’s oceans release huge volumes of polluting emissions. Existing fleets badly need a clean-up.
By Kieran Cooke, Climate News Network
June 25th, 2020

LONDON, 25 June, 2020 − The shipping industry is in urgent need of a makeover: while limited attempts are being made to lessen polluting emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases in the road transport and aviation sectors, shipping lags even further behind in the clean-up stakes.

Maritime traffic is a major source of emissions, each year belching out thousands of tonnes of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and other pollutants. “If the sector were a country, it would be the 6th highest emitter [of GHGs] in the world, ranked between Germany and Japan”, says a study in the journal BMC Energy.

Involving researchers at the Tyndall Centre and the University of Manchester in the UK, the study says reducing emissions in the shipping industry has tended to focus on the introduction of new, low-carbon vessels.

The researchers point out that ships have a comparatively long life span: in 2018 the average age of a ship being scrapped was 28 years.

The study says ageing ships are a major source of pollution: in order to cut global emissions of CO2 and other gases and meet the targets set in the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, the world’s existing shipping fleet must undergo a substantial revamp.

Dr John Broderick, a climate change specialist at the University of Manchester, says time is of the essence.

“Unlike in aviation, there are many different ways to decarbonise the shipping sector, but there must be much greater attention paid to retrofitting the existing fleet, before it’s too late to deliver on the net-zero target.”
» Read article        
» Read the study on maritime traffic emissions         

10-4 little buddy
New Rule in California Will Require Zero-Emissions Trucks
More than half of trucks sold in the state must be zero-emissions by 2035, and all of them by 2045.
By Hiroko Tabuchi, New York Times
June 25, 2020

Rebuffing strong opposition from industry, California on Thursday adopted a landmark rule requiring more than half of all trucks sold in the state to be zero-emissions by 2035, a move that is expected to improve local air quality, rein in greenhouse gas emissions and sharply curtail the state’s dependence on oil.

The rule, the first in the United States, represents a victory for communities that have long suffered from truck emissions — particularly pollution from the diesel trucks that feed the sprawling hubs that serve the state’s booming e-commerce industry. On one freeway in the Inland Empire region of Southern California, near the nation’s largest concentration of Amazon warehouses, a community group recently counted almost 1,200 delivery trucks passing in one hour.

Oil companies, together with farming and other industries, opposed the measure, calling it unrealistic, expensive and an example of regulatory overreach. Truck and engine manufacturers also opposed the rule, and began a last-ditch effort in March to delay it, saying companies were already suffering from the effects of the Covid-19 crisis.
» Read article        
» Read California Air Resources Board (CARB) fact sheet

» More about clean transportation

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY

PA grand jury slams shale gas oversightState AG Shapiro: Grand jury report reveals Pa.’s systemic failure to regulate shale gas industry
By Don Hopey and Laura Legere, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
June 25, 2020

A statewide grand jury investigating the operations and regulation of the shale gas drilling industry has issued a scathing report detailing the systemic failure of the state environment and health departments in regulating the industry and protecting public health.

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro, who released the 235-page report on the grand jury’s two-year investigation Thursday morning, said it uncovers the “initial failure” more than a dozen years ago of the state Department of Environmental Protection to respond to and regulate the shale gas industry and the impacts of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.”

And, while the Wolf administration has made improvements at the agency, the grand jury said, there remains room for improvement.

“This report is about preventing the failures of our past from continuing into our future,” Mr. Shapiro said. “It’s about the big fights we must take on to protect Pennsylvanians — to ensure that their voices are not drowned out by those with bigger wallets and better connections. There remains a profound gap between our constitutional mandate for clean air and pure water, and the realities facing Pennsylvanians who live in the shadow of fracking giants and their investors.”
» Read article        
» Read the grand jury report

consumer fraud in MN
Alleging Consumer Fraud, Minnesota Sues Exxon, Koch, and API for Climate Change Deception
By Amy Westervelt, Drilled News
June 24, 2020

Minnesota on Wednesday joined the growing number of states and municipalities seeking damages from the fossil fuel industry for knowingly deceiving consumers about climate change and its impacts. But Attorney General Keith Ellison is charting a different and potentially groundbreaking legal course from those lawsuits, by suing ExxonMobil, Koch Industries, and the American Petroleum Institute under state laws that prohibit lying to consumers.

To date the majority of this generation of climate suits are nuisance cases. They allege that fossil fuel companies’ efforts to misinform the public on climate change successfully delayed for decades any regulations and other actions to slow or stop it, creating the need for billions of dollars in mitigation costs that municipal and state governments could otherwise have avoided. In those cases, which include among others suits filed by the cities of Oakland and San Francisco, Calif., and Boulder, Colo.,, the plaintiffs are seeking damages: They want fossil fuel companies to pay their fair share of the cost of climate adaptation.

The Minnesota case is different in a few key ways:
» Read article        
» Read the complaint        
» Read Attorney General Ellison’s press release            

SCOTUS photo
Fossil Fuel Companies and Their Supporters Ask Supreme Court to Intervene in Climate Lawsuits
By Dana Drugmand, DeSmog Blog
June 23, 2020

California communities last month got an important procedural win in their efforts to get fossil fuel companies to pay for climate-related impacts. On May 26, a federal appeals court ruled that their lawsuits could go ahead in state court, which is their preferred venue, rather than federal court.

Similar lawsuits filed by Colorado communities, Baltimore, and Rhode Island are also marching on in state courts following unsuccessful attempts by fossil fuel companies to have the cases heard in federal courts, where they are more likely to be dismissed. Overall, the communities lodging these legal battles seem to be gaining momentum.

However, some of the companies facing those lawsuits appear to be gearing up for a larger battle, looking to the Supreme Court to weigh in and using their network of promoters to continue attacking these lawsuits outside the courtroom.

One such supporter of fossil fuel companies is the Manufacturers’ Accountability Project (MAP). An initiative of the trade group the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), it’s designed to push back against climate litigation targeting NAM members such as ExxonMobil and Chevron. Since the project launched in November 2017, MAP has been fiercely criticizing climate liability lawsuits like those in California.

In the wake of the recent Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling, MAP Special Counsel Phil Goldberg issued a statement calling on the Supreme Court to take a definitive stance on these climate cases.
» Read article               
» Read the MAP statement

closing time
Support grows for taxpayer-funded oil well cleanup as an economic stimulus
Democrats leading the push say their plan has no real downside, while critics say it gives the industry a pass.
By Mark Olalde, Energy News Network
June 23, 2020

When the U.S. was fighting to emerge from the Great Depression in the 1930s, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched ambitious public works projects to put people back on the job. Now, with the country in the midst of another crushing economic slowdown, can cleaning up oil and gas wells fill in as a similar stimulus?

Environmental groups have generally supported the plan if it focuses on orphan wells and comes with the possibility of bonding reform. “We strongly urge you to take steps to ensure this orphaned well problem does not reoccur due to insufficient bonding standards,” Sara Kendall, program director with the Western Organization of Resource Councils, which advocates for landowners and the environment, said during the June 1 forum.

And a report published Thursday by CarbonTracker found the industry is facing hundreds of billions of dollars of cleanup costs, most of which it will be unable to fund.

A federal program would come with precedent. Canada recently unveiled a very similar push, which included CA$1.7 billion for orphan well cleanup, nearly all that money as a grant that wouldn’t need to be paid back.

Regan Boychuk is a Canadian environmentalist and expert on well decommissioning costs with the Alberta Liabilities Disclosure Project, a coalition of landowners, former regulators and other stakeholders. He said that it’s “wonderful to put people back to work, wonderful to get this stuff cleaned up. But if the wrong people are paying for it, we’re moving in the wrong direction.”

In America, some green groups agree with Boychuk and oppose the centrist approach of paying for — some say subsidizing — the oil and gas industry’s cleanup with potentially minimal strings attached.
» Read article               
» Read the Carbon Tracker report       

» More about fossil fuel

BIOMASS

white rhino
British Columbia poised to lose ‘white rhino of old growth forests’
By Justin Catanoso, Mongabay
June 22, 2020

The lush, green interior of British Columbia, Canada, is renowned as the home of one of the last-remaining inland temperate rainforests on earth. BC’s towering, centuries-old red cedar, western hemlock, spruce and subalpine fir make up a wet, complex ecosystem brimming with wildlife, ranging from endangered woodland caribou, grizzlies, diverse birdlife and tiny lichens.

But the province’s rare old-growth forests are shrinking dramatically due to encroaching timber harvesting, especially for wood-pellets used to fuel the industrial biomass-burning industry, now fast replacing coal-fired electrical power plants around the globe.

British Columbia’s old-growth is in desperate need of protection, according to the stark findings of two recent studies prepared for the Victoria-based provincial government, which for the first time in a generation is considering a new old-growth forest management plan that could permanently save what’s left from chainsaws, sawmills and wood pelletizing plants.

“Almost every productive ecosystem across BC has very low levels of old forest remaining, and in many areas of BC, this remaining productive old growth is at risk of being logged in the next five years,” said Rachel Holt, a forest ecologist and co-author of one of the studies. “Current provincial policies are inadequate to protect old-growth ecosystems. And without immediate change to both the policy and how it is implemented, BC is on a path to losing these irreplaceable forests forever.”

“We want to stop the harvesting of primary forests here, and we think the forest industry should start focusing on second-growth forests,” said Michelle Connolly, a forest ecologist with the environmental advocacy group Conservation North, which provided research for a second study. “With the advent of bioenergy [wood pellets for export], we have to extend our area of immediate concern to all primary forests. None of it is safe now.”
» Read article        

» More about biomass

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